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Exploring Anonymous Posts: Insights into the Eye Care Industry

In the eye care industry, anonymity might be utilized to facilitate open and honest discussions about sensitive topics. This approach could be particularly beneficial in situations where individuals feel uncomfortable or embarrassed discussing certain issues openly.

Anonymous postings emerged within the Corporate Optometry Facebook group prior to Facebook implementing this feature. It provided optometrists with a platform to ask questions they hesitated to post openly. Individuals would privately message the admin, who would then share the question on their behalf. The members of the group placed their trust in the admin, who remained loyal to their commitment to anonymity, even in the face of pressure from larger entities. True leaders demonstrate integrity by refusing to disclose sensitive information when subjected to high-pressure tactics.

With time, this concept gained traction within the eye care community, prompting other groups to adopt it. It fostered a culture of trust and authenticity, contributing to the growth of the Facebook group. Optometrists relied on the group admin to share sensitive content and seek guidance on topics ranging from employers and contracts to medical case.

The trend gained even more momentum when Facebook introduced the option to post anonymously directly in all groups, facilitating its widespread adoption. It’s now a common practice across many groups and has become standard in social media posting. This shift has encouraged people to express themselves more freely without fear of reprisal. While this concept isn’t new, similar platforms like Indeed and Glassdoor have long allowed former employees to anonymously review their jobs.

Anonymous posting carries potential disadvantages, especially if individuals misuse their anonymity for personal gain or to spread false information, or to launch attacks on others. The authenticity that has fostered growth within the Corporate Optometry Facebook group is crucial; members can discern between genuine and fabricated posts. Mishandled anonymous posting can tarnish a brand’s reputation if not executed with care and integrity.This approach allows individuals to share valuable insights and information without the pressure of being identified or scrutinized. It can potentially shed light on issues and help bring attention to them very quickly and create accountability.

I’m pleased that others adopted my approach to anonymous social posts. It’s gratifying to see how it has positively impacted our industry. It’s a reminder that one person’s idea can lead to significant changes in behavior and practices within a community. Absolutely, with the power to influence comes the responsibility to use it wisely and authentically. While anonymous social posts can be a powerful tool for fostering open dialogue and positive change, it’s crucial to consider the potential consequences of posting for personal gains. Maintaining authenticity and integrity in our interactions, even in anonymous forums, is essential to preserving trust and credibility within the Corporate Optometry community.

Overall, anonymous posts in the eye care industry can foster a sense of community, support, and education while respecting individuals’ privacy and comfort levels. It has broken down barriers to communication and empower individuals to speak up about important issues. Giving optometrists a voice to change our industry.

Clarity Unveiled: The Transformative Power of Transparency

In a recent survey within the corporate optometry sector revealed that 98% of Optometrists expressed dissatisfaction with the transparency level regarding decision-making in corporate optometry. Given the recent industry-wide changes in the corporate sector, numerous Optometrists are turning to the Corporate Optometry Facebook group for updates and the latest information about their respective companies. Optometrists deserve receiving information directly from the company rather than relying on social media for updates.

Over the years, transparency has become increasingly crucial in corporate optometry. Factors such as acquisitions to store closures have impacted many ODs. The expansion of telemedicine, and AI have made notable changes in our industry. In the current recession, marked by high uncertainty, optometrists face reduced lay offs, reduced hours, decreased bonuses, and salaries.

Leadership changes, especially when executives transition to entirely different industries, pose challenges for building lasting business relationships. To ensure long-term success, accountability must extend across the board.

Optometrists seek quality partnerships with in high trustworthiness, recognizing that transparency is the building blocks maintaining trust in professional relationships. In an era marked by low optometrist retention and high turnover, effective communication becomes vital to reduce uncertainty and anxiety among optometrists. ODs involvement in major decisions fosters engagement, ultimately contributing to increased revenue for both the store and the company. ODs want to part of something, help build something greater than just their career. Involve them in discusses, listen to feedback. Decisions made should take into account OD’s careers as well.

There are many metrics on how individuals are tracked by performance, yet being transparent and ethic is not one of those. Many decisions that are made are to benefit an individual. Leaders within organizations need to understand that their decisions many times impact many ODs, families, an entire industry and patient care. If transparency was measured, you would find that many ODs follow and value individuals that might not be a decision maker but a person that is trustworthy and transparent. The moral can change when decisions are made in a collaborative method and open communication on initiatives.

Transparency in corporate decision-making is crucial for creating a positive work environment, maintaining trust, and ensuring the success and growth of both the optometry practice and the careers of individual optometrists. Open communication builds a foundation for better results and higher OD retention and better patient outcomes. Ultimately, the impact of transparency extends beyond just disclosures, it shapes a culture of accountability and collaboration that strengthens any organization. Image an industry with no hidden agendas and the future is as clear as 20/20.

5 Qualities You Need to Be a Successful Optopreneur

Have you been thinking about starting your own optometry business? Building a business from the ground up and running it successfully is no easy feat. As is with every type of industry these days, the competition is intense.

But no obstacle is too big to deter a true entrepreneur from his or her chosen path. You may already have an entrepreneurial spirit. But even if you don’t, it’s possible to develop the qualities of a successful entrepreneur with practice.

1. Do What Others Won’t

Coming up with an idea and sticking with it is the most definitive trait of an entrepreneur. A successful entrepreneur goes with what clicks their mind rather than blindly following other’s opinions and acting on someone’s ideas. You shouldn’t waste your time and energy overthinking matters to the point that taking even the first step becomes too much of a task.

What you need to do is collect your thoughts in a way that allows you to come up with a productive plan for implementing your idea.

2. Say Yes to all opportunities

Being an entrepreneur demands being confident and believing in your skills and abilities. Having confidence in yourself gives you the strength to deal with the hardships that may come up in your way from time to time. True entrepreneurs readily accept every opportunity that comes their way because ‘no’ is not an option for them.

You must learn to be self-sufficient and self-reliant as well.

3. Don’t Let Anyone Put You Down

Entrepreneurs are met with all kinds of opinions and advice, including the helpful as well as the not-so-helpful one. Your friends and family members can particularly have a strong influence on how you perceive the feasibility of your plan. Listen to people who genuinely support you. And meanwhile, ignore and isolate yourself from the environment where you feel negativity towards your business. People may talk you into stay in your comfort zone and avoiding going into unchartered waters. As a true entrepreneur, remember to stay firm on your beliefs and not let anyone put you or your ideas down.

4. Stay Strong and Positive

You have to be fearless to be successful. If you don’t succeed at first, keep trying until you do. Remember that failure is not defined by incurring few losses but only when you stop struggling to achieve the goal that you initially set for yourself. Your so-called mistakes are actually a learning opportunity as they can teach you a lot about where to start from and what not to do the second time. Entrepreneurs stay focused on their goals and never give up as they know that great things happen by doing hard work.

5. Stand Up for What You Believe

When entrepreneurs introduce an idea or launch a startup, there’s always a chance that someone or the other will oppose them. A smart entrepreneur respects the freedom of speech but at the same time knows how to stand up and defend his or her ideas. It’s good to learn the art of how to disagree without being disrespectful to others, while maintaining one’s dignity at the same time.

Reflect on your work attitude and aptitude. You may already have the qualities of a successful entrepreneur but might not have realized it yet. If you can master these skills as an optometrist, rest assured that the world is your oyster.

CO Analytics: 73% of ODs are involved in the optical.

One misconception in the industry is that Corporate ODs aren’t involved in the optical. A recent survey illustrates that 73% of ODs are meeting with optical managers to collaborate on company initiatives and their sublease needs.To increase optical sales, the optical manager can collaborate with the Optometrist. Corporate ODs prescribe lenses from the exam chair. Corporate ODs are decision-makers in our industry.  Whether the collaborations are daily or once a month, bridging the gap between the optical and the OD side of the business is vital. Historically, the better the communication between the two the better both businesses operate and generate higher revenue.

When it comes to the OD/optical staff meeting there are several important topics that are discussed. Some topics include exam business, # of exams, # of cancellations, # of walkins and OD coverage. Those topics coordinate with the optical sales. Optical business metrics are discussed and both parties look to partner to accomplish the goals that they have for the month and for the year.

Here are some topics for ODs to discuss with their optical managers about their subleases.

  1. Your Financial Performance: . Discuss revenue, profitability, cash flow, and the volume of managed care in your practice. Analyze previous month to date exam count and financial statements.
  2. Market Analysis: Evaluate the optical’s position in the industry. What is their acquisition cost per patient, growth in new customers, and competition in with 10 mile radius.
  3. Sales and Marketing: Review the effectiveness of sales and marketing strategies. Discuss the performance of various marketing channels, advertising campaigns, and sales efforts. Explore customer acquisition and retention strategies and analyze their impact on the bottom line.
  4. Efficiency: Assess how your sublease and optical can work efficiently to see walkins and increase patient volume during the hours of operation that you have. General rule is each day of coverage you are providing you are supposed to see 10-12 patients a day. Do not add days to the week until you are booked consistently.
  5. Customer Satisfaction: Examine customer satisfaction levels and feedback. Discuss strategies to enhance customer experience in order to increase patient retention. Many opticals have a NPS system.
  6. Outlook and Strategy: Discuss your objectives with the sublease and what you are looking to do in the future. This could be taking on a new sublease, expanding to hiring an associate, adding new equipment etc. . Identify areas for improvement, ask for feedback from optical.

CO Analytics: 27% of ODs worked Memorial Day

One common misconception in corporate optometry is that ODs work most holidays. A recent survey in the Corporate Optometry Facebook Group, asked if ODs were working on Memorial Day. 216 Corporate ODs responded to the survey. 27% of ODs worked memorial day, many were employed ODs. 73% of ODs decided to take the day off.. The ODs that were sublease and worked were usually at Lenscrafters or Visionworks, which are usually in a mall setting and hours are determined by the mall hours of operation.

How to Talk About Payment Options With Your Patients

Financial management is key in running an optometry practice successfully. Talk about payment options with patients in an effective manner to increase the likelihood of payment, and improve client-provider relationship.

If you feel too shy to discuss payment, tell yourself that you are running a business and deserve to be paid. Here are 3 basic guidelines to keep your patients well-informed about their financial responsibility.

1.      Be Transparent

Rule number 1 is to be open about the financial responsibilities of your patients from the beginning. Let them know about the procedures, costs, and payment options in advance.

Even if the cost of a particular treatment at your optometry practice is relatively high, do not hesitate to start discussing it with your patients. In fact, patients prefer you being open with them.

Talk to them about aspects that are covered and not covered by their insurance plans, so that they can allocate a budget accordingly. Also make sure you inform them about all payment options and the time when payment is due.

2.      Educate Your Staff

You can educate your staff regarding basic billing, so that they are able to talk about payment options with patients. Your employees should be able to effectively inform them about treatment costs at your optometry practice.

Make sure your clinical staff is aware of examination and treatment costs that may not be covered by insurance, so that they can alert patients accordingly. You can also provide scripts to your employees to help them talk about costs with patients in the right way.

Before the patient meets you, your staff members can give them a briefing about the procedures and their costs. If a certain procedure is not coverable by insurance, a staff member can guide them with signing a statement of financial responsibility. Train your employees to not hesitate and ask for payment in a firm yet diplomatic manner.

However, in certain scenarios, it is difficult for a staff member to brief the patients. For instance, while you are examining a patient, you may feel that a certain procedure needs to be performed. In that case, you can call someone from the billing staff to come back and explain the extra fee to the patient. Alternatively, you can opt for providing a more personalized experience by informing the patient yourself.

3.      Choose the Right Medium

Make sure you communicate the costs of your services or treatments in a simple and convenient manner. Phone calls and emails are conventional and reliable options, but with an expansion in digital communication, several more ways are now available.

According to a survey conducted by Truecaller, 64% of the adults admitted that they do not answer phone calls from an unknown number. Sending text messages is a quick way to let patients know the costs and payment options. Patients can easily read messages and follow a link to make the payment through their mobile phones, tablets, smartwatches, or other devices.

Making payment easy and quick for patients will improve your cashflow and increase response rates. Keep payment options flexible for patients, as some may still prefer a paper bill.

You can also use online options to inform patients about finances. It is a good idea to have a web page within your website or a tab on your Facebook page devoted to financial responsibility, payment plans, and insurance.

Discussing finances may initially make you feel uncomfortable. However, with the right strategies, you can conveniently and politely talk about payment options with patients. Make sure your staff also understands the importance of keeping patients updated.

5 Reasons Why a Corporate Optometry Sublease Might be the Best Option During Recession

Subleasing space in corporate optometry might be the best option during a recession. Subleasing can come with particular challenges, but much less risk than starting a private practice cold during a recession. Subleasing starting costs are much less than starting a new practice.

A successful optometry clinic is about finding a suitable location that attracts patents, analyzing competition, and ensuring you’re doing what it takes to thrive in the healthcare sector. The last few years haven’t been ideal, considering the high unemployment rate and COVID-19. However, subleasing space might be best option during a recession.

Let’s explore why subleasing in a recession might be best option.

1. Available Resources

When a recession hits the economy, it might become challenging in many ways. However, if you look closely, you’ll find more resources than ever. Resources that provided from corporate to help you succeed. Many times corporate has data to forecast economic changes and provide a game plan to help your sublease.

2. Less Competition

Some experts say recession might be the best time to sublease your corporate optometry, as there’s almost no competition during the economic downturn. Operating during a recession can help you get a competitive edge and make arranging funding more accessible. Since covid, some offices have closed down and we will see more closure during a recession. Finding a sublease that has been established and working between 2 might be the best option.

3. Inflation

Prices will go up during an inflation. Many corporate optometry subleases have kept OD’s rent the same. We will start to see more patients come into retail locations as they look for more affordable healthcare. The volume will help you grow during a recession. A recession is undoubtedly not the best economic situation, but if you’re clever, you’ll manage to make the best use of recession.

4. More Motivation

Every optometrist aims have their own practice, which brings them the required motivation to start their clinic. Knowing a recession is here, might be the motivation to work harder and continue to strive to succeed.

5. Reduce Unemployment

Many people lose their jobs and actively seek employment when a recession hits. When you begin subleasing your optometry clinic, you’ll need valuable people to help you run your business effectively. You’ll get a chance to improve the economy’s situation by providing work to unemployed people.

The more people earn, the more stable the economy will eventually become. Hence, unemployed individuals find jobs, and you get a team of hard workers who run day-to-day tasks effectively and handle patient care. Again, a win-win.

5 Essential Business Planning Tips That Can Help Optometrists Survive a Recession.

Various small businesses could be severely hit by a recession. Proper planning is the key to long-term business success. And it becomes all the more important in the face of uncertain circumstances such as the ones we are facing currently.

Here are five essential business planning tips that every optometrist must follow if they wish to power through a recession and ensure sustained growth in the coming year.

1. Think Strategically

There are several strategic approaches that optometrists can benefit from. Strategic thinking is what helps you succeed in a competitive market. Businesses that don’t have a strategic plan in place are bound to have a hard time in fulfilling their short term as well as long term goals.

Take time to think about your business’s vision and mission. What is your unique selling proposition? How do your products and services differ from those of your competitors? Do you do any specialty care?

Focus on aspects that will prompt customers to choose your services over the alternative options.

2. Don’t Skip Marketing

Your revenues may be down these days, but that’s no reason to skip marketing. Marketing plays a key role in keeping your business in the public eye. You can cut down on the marketing budget if you want. But don’t forgo it altogether.

Identify the channels that can bring in the maximum customers and run your marketing campaigns on those platforms only. Staying active on social media is a great way to connect with your audience, so don’t forget to leverage that.

3. Form Alliances

One of the most strategic business planning tips in today’s economy is to form alliances. Collaborating with other optometry businesses operating both locally and other medical professionals can help you gain access to new streams of income. It can enable you to identify and exploit opportunities that still exist in an otherwise halted economy.

4. Sort Out Your Finances

Finances are the core element that determine the viability of your business plan. Make sure that you always have sufficient capital at hand for debt servicing, asset acquisition, business expansion, and the likes.

In addition to the current expenses, think about other costs you may incur down the lane.

5. Structure Your Workforce

You need to think about the future implications on your business in regards to your staff.

Will those employees be willing to rejoin when your business gains momentum again if you cut their hours? Do you want them to rejoin or wish to hire new workers instead? What are the skills you will need to keep your business running in a changing economy?

If you plan to hire new employees, make sure you have capital available for any training that may be required.

End Note

No one plans to fail; they fail to plan. So, follow these business planning tips to help your optometry business not just survive, but thrive regardless of how the economy may be performing.

Recipe for Success in Optometry: Grit and Resilience

Grit and resilience are key ingredients in the recipe of success. Humans possess a remarkable ability to work hard towards their goals and keep recovering from setbacks in the way.

You can succeed in your life and career as an optometrist once you understand the growth mindset and discover the power of grit and resilience. Keep reading to know how you can boost your resolve and keep setting and achieving high targets.

What is the Growth Mindset?

The Growth Mindset is a belief that you can achieve something once you acquire the skill to do so. Carol Dweck, an American psychologist, has identified two kinds of mindsets: fixed and growth.

A person with a fixed mindset believes that basic qualities are inherent and different ones cannot be developed. Growth mindset, on the other hand, dictates that you can enhance your qualities through efforts.

An individual may have a fixed mindset about some abilities and a growth mindset about others. For instance, a person may firmly believe that sketching well is a built-in talent that they cannot acquire. On the other hand, they may feel that they can improve in sports with enough practice.

It is imperative to approach your life and career with a growth mindset in order to succeed in your life and career as an optometrist. You may not have scored a high grade after studying optometry, but that doesn’t mean you cannot become a successful optometrist after gaining experience in the industry.

Developing Grit and Resilience

Grit implies resolve, and resilience refers to your ability to bounce back from a stressful situation. People who are able to grow are those who learn to overcome obstacles and setbacks. Here is how you can develop grit and resilience in your life and career as an optometrist:

1. Asses Yourself

Want to figure out how resilient you are? Take a quiz online to evaluate the extent to which you adhere to a growth mindset. Gauging you abilities will help you determine whether you are on the right track. If the results show that you have a growth mindset, work on enhancing it. In case you discover that you have a relatively rigid frame of mind, it is time to start taking corrective measures.

2. Stay Around Positive People

Your mindset helps define your life. Likewise, the thoughts and behavior of the people around you also influence your reality. You cannot always opt to be around the people of your choice, but you can selective about who you wish to spend most of your time with. Engage in productive discussions with fellow optometrists and keep in touch with your mentor in the field to stay motivated.

3. Set Goals

Grit involves maintaining interest and effort towards long-term goals. It can get difficult to make a lasting commitment, especially if you face several hurdles in the way. Nevertheless, it is important to remember that success comes to those who stay strong, even through times of crisis. Don’t shy away from ambitious targets. Work hard and persevere to make your mark in the field of optometry.

4. Celebrate Milestones

Success doesn’t always have to be measured in the form of outcomes. Sometimes, you make painstaking efforts, but victory gets delayed. Pat yourself on the back for the hard work and know that setbacks are always a possibility. Making efforts in the right direction will always be fruitful, even if it takes some time.

It takes time and effort to reach your goals and to stay strong in the face of obstacles. Once you adopt grit and resilience, you will understand that hard work always pays off. A positive and driven mindset will eventually bring success in your life and career as an optometrist.

How Optometry is Changing Because of Millennial ODs.

There is an effect of generation on the optometry industry that is changing expectations from optometry clinics. Millennials and optometry have an important correlation since there are steady changes happening in technology, practice management, work-life balance, patient care already and diversity and inclusion.

Trends in Optometry

Millennial ODs have economic reality and attractive flexibility. Since millennials have high debt, don’t have huge capital possibilities, corporate optometry has become the an attractive option.

Millennials are part of the digital generation, where technology is prioritized for every industry. They also wired to expect high efficiency and productivity. They also use technology to build relationships with patients.

Digital Future of Optometry

Modern offices are turning towards digital space to increase efficiency. This can include looking into software for billing, appointments, and booking – things like cloud access and digital imaging for records and patient data. Optometry offices are being expanded to digital spaces for greater accessibility.

Cloud Adoption

The willingness millennials have to turn towards the cloud is great in the millennial general. Millennials and optometry involve incorporating IT setups, hardware, and software. It can mean more training as well as costs from tech glitches. If an optometry clinic has different office locations, it can mean the use of multiple IT systems, which can lead to expenditure cost.

Millennials are turning the trend to optometry offices towards incorporating the right sort of technology into the right spaces. A model that needs HIPAA compliance and has a fully-managed and secure structure. It also gives room to optometry clinics to be more transparent with their customers. Through seamless integration, there is increased accountability of the optometry clinics too. With more optometry clinics, you can still have the same procedures and implement a similar structure with the help of technology.

Diversity and Inclusive

Young ODs want to feel part of something bigger. They make sure the promotion practices throughout the organization follow are unbiased and equitable. They are looking for a structured internal mobility program to provide equal opportunities. Many corporate opticals like Warby Parker have taken steps to help grow diversity in optometry. Many millennial ODs feel they belong at Warby Parker and have taken subleases and employed positions.

Millennial ODs have changed how the industry performs and works with its patients and workforce. This can be quite a positive change in terms of relationships, efficiency, and ability to expand.