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The Power of Rejection: How Entrepreneurs Turn No Into Yes

Rejection is something that we all face at some point in our lives. Whether it’s in our personal or professional lives, rejection is an unavoidable part of the human experience.

For entrepreneurs, rejection is a part of the journey. In fact, some of the most successful entrepreneurs have faced more rejection than anyone else. The key is to use rejection to your advantage and learn from it.

In this article, we’ll explore the power of rejection and how entrepreneurs can use it to their advantage. We’ll also look at the importance of a positive mindset and how it can help you overcome the fear of rejection.

1. Embrace rejection as a learning experience

One of the most important things you can do as an entrepreneur is to embrace rejection as a learning experience. If you can learn from rejection, it can become a powerful tool in your entrepreneurial journey. For example, if a potential investor rejects your business idea, ask for feedback and learn from their perspective. Use their feedback to refine your idea and make it stronger.

2. Don’t take it personally

It’s natural to feel disappointed or frustrated when you face rejection, but it’s important not to take it personally. Remember, rejection is not a reflection of your worth or ability. It simply means that the opportunity wasn’t the right fit for you at that time. Keep that in mind and move forward with a positive attitude.

3. Cultivate a growth mindset

A growth mindset is a powerful tool in overcoming rejection. Instead of seeing rejection as a failure, see it as an opportunity to learn and grow. Believe that your abilities can be developed through hard work and dedication, and that challenges help you reach your potential. Cultivate a growth mindset to help you overcome the fear of rejection and thrive as an entrepreneur.

4. Develop resilience

Resilience is the ability to bounce back from setbacks and continue moving forward. As an entrepreneur, you will face many setbacks and rejections, but resilience will help you stay motivated and focused on your goals. Develop resilience by focusing on your strengths, setting achievable goals, and building a support network of people who believe in you.

5. Stay persistent Persistence is key to success as an entrepreneur. Don’t let rejection discourage you or make you give up on your dreams. Keep pushing forward, even when it feels like the odds are against you. Remember that every successful entrepreneur has faced rejection at some point, and persistence is what separates the successful from the unsuccessful. In conclusion, rejection is a part of the entrepreneurial journey. However, by embracing rejection as a learning experience, cultivating a growth mindset, developing resilience, and staying persistent, you can use rejection to your advantage and achieve your goals. Remember, rejection is not a reflection of your worth, but rather an opportunity to grow and improve.

ODs want Executives in Optical Stores.

In recent news,  Starbucks’ new CEO Laxman Narasimhan says he plans to work once a month in one of the company’s stores in an effort to stay close to its culture and customers. He claims that it will help him understand the business by immersing himself in every part of the business.  Many times CEO’s are out of touch on what is going on at the store levels, this includes the optical industry.  As a leader in the organization, they come up with a strategic plan and make decisions on what might be best direction for the company for that time. Hindsight is always 20/20! Many optical leaders are result driven and are nearsighted about decisions that might bring positive numbers now but bigger losses in the future.

Recently, I posted a poll in the Corporate Optometry Facebook group and  I asked,

“Do you think that Executives in Optical should work in stores on a regular basis?”

66% of  Corporate ODs stated YES, they think that upper management should work in the stores. This would provide  realistic expectations on goals created and help upper management understand the customer experience, and employee work culture. Working with the OD on that side of the business would help gain awareness on struggles that ODs face on a daily basis. Working the hours of operations that many do til 7pm or 8pm and weekends, to immerse themselves in this burnout culture that has been created to meet goals.  Eye Care Directors should spend a day leading by example seeing 4 or more patients an hour or doing telemed exams. Having them illustrate policies and procedures that have been created as sales tactics and marketing materials that are out dated.  Getting to know employees and ODs at a personal level will create employee engagement, satisfaction and reduce turnover.

The most alarming stat from the survey was that 28% of the responses stated that they didn’t think the executives could handle working in the stores.  This illustrates that many don’t have confidence in leadership competence, and that expectations are unrealistic. Leadership is so far removed from the ground truth.  

Exercising this idea as an active “role playing” in an organization. This type of leadership can be viewed as servant leadership. This style is based on leaders serving the greater good of the team and organization, than personal growth. With time, it would create new culture in companies and cultivate new ideas for programs to improve customer service, building trust, employee engagement and satisfaction. Image the change our industry could have and evolve if executives rolled up their sleeves and experienced the daily struggles that staff and ODs have!

5 Reasons New Patients Aren’t Finding Your Optometry Practice Online

According to a report published by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), more than 12 million adults in the US require medical treatment for eye problems every year. This means that the demand for optometrists is very strong. If attracting new patients to your clinic seems like a tedious task, then your digital marketing tactics might be to blame. Take a look at the top 5 reasons why new patients might not be finding your optometry practice online.

1.     You Have a Small Online Footprint

Gone are the days when people referred the Yellow Pages to find an optician or eye care provider in their locality. Now, it’s the online directories, i.e., the internet that they consult. If your practice’s profile information is incomplete or missing on popular online directories, especially Google, you are missing out on huge opportunities to grow your customer base.

Make sure all the local citations for your business are correct and up to date. Maintaining a Google My Business account is usually a good idea as it helps you manage your practice info and ensure the accuracy of data for potential patients searching for eye care services near you.

2.     Your Optometry Website is Not Optimized

A local consumer review survey reveals that at least one in every four patients searched for a local health care provider online before visiting the clinic in person. Therefore, ensuring that your business website ranks high on local search queries should be your top priority. To optimize your practice website for the search engines, you need to follow a proper SEO strategy. Some of the main steps for creating a winning website include:

  • Conducting keyword research
  • Using the most-searched-for keywords strategically in your web pages
  • Regularly publishing well-written, quality content
  • Using internal and external links to reputable websites to increase domain authority
  • Choosing a well-structured and easy to navigate web design

3.     You Do Not Have Online Patient Reviews

Reviews and ratings from existing patients play an important role in attracting new ones to your practice. Therefore, you must gather and post patients reviews on your optometry practice website. Online feedback assures new patients of the quality of care you provide. Plus, it can also help increase your website ranking on the search engine results page. Google states that positive customer reviews help improve the visibility of businesses online.

You can distribute survey forms for collecting patient feedback and upload them by yourself. Or you can simply ask your patients to share their post-visit thoughts on your website.  

4.     You Are Not Using Social Media

More than 75% of the US adult population uses one or more types of social media websites. So, if you aren’t maintaining an active presence on these sites, you are bound to face difficulty in attracting new patients to your practice.

Staying active on social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram not only raises brand awareness and your practice visibility but also helps you build a stronger relationship with your clients.

5.     You Do Not Have a Blog

ODs who do not include blogging in their practice marketing strategy are shooting themselves in the foot. Blogging helps enhance your search engine ranking by positioning your practice website among the top results. To get the best results with blogging, try to offer a mix of sponsored and organic content.

Some of the main topics you must write about include the services you provide and common questions patients ask about different treatment plans.

Attracting new patients to your optometry practice requires time and effort, but you can easily grow your patient base if you avoid the common marketing mistakes discussed above.

How to Talk About Payment Options With Your Patients

Financial management is key in running an optometry practice successfully. Talk about payment options with patients in an effective manner to increase the likelihood of payment, and improve client-provider relationship.

If you feel too shy to discuss payment, tell yourself that you are running a business and deserve to be paid. Here are 3 basic guidelines to keep your patients well-informed about their financial responsibility.

1.      Be Transparent

Rule number 1 is to be open about the financial responsibilities of your patients from the beginning. Let them know about the procedures, costs, and payment options in advance.

Even if the cost of a particular treatment at your optometry practice is relatively high, do not hesitate to start discussing it with your patients. In fact, patients prefer you being open with them.

Talk to them about aspects that are covered and not covered by their insurance plans, so that they can allocate a budget accordingly. Also make sure you inform them about all payment options and the time when payment is due.

2.      Educate Your Staff

You can educate your staff regarding basic billing, so that they are able to talk about payment options with patients. Your employees should be able to effectively inform them about treatment costs at your optometry practice.

Make sure your clinical staff is aware of examination and treatment costs that may not be covered by insurance, so that they can alert patients accordingly. You can also provide scripts to your employees to help them talk about costs with patients in the right way.

Before the patient meets you, your staff members can give them a briefing about the procedures and their costs. If a certain procedure is not coverable by insurance, a staff member can guide them with signing a statement of financial responsibility. Train your employees to not hesitate and ask for payment in a firm yet diplomatic manner.

However, in certain scenarios, it is difficult for a staff member to brief the patients. For instance, while you are examining a patient, you may feel that a certain procedure needs to be performed. In that case, you can call someone from the billing staff to come back and explain the extra fee to the patient. Alternatively, you can opt for providing a more personalized experience by informing the patient yourself.

3.      Choose the Right Medium

Make sure you communicate the costs of your services or treatments in a simple and convenient manner. Phone calls and emails are conventional and reliable options, but with an expansion in digital communication, several more ways are now available.

According to a survey conducted by Truecaller, 64% of the adults admitted that they do not answer phone calls from an unknown number. Sending text messages is a quick way to let patients know the costs and payment options. Patients can easily read messages and follow a link to make the payment through their mobile phones, tablets, smartwatches, or other devices.

Making payment easy and quick for patients will improve your cashflow and increase response rates. Keep payment options flexible for patients, as some may still prefer a paper bill.

You can also use online options to inform patients about finances. It is a good idea to have a web page within your website or a tab on your Facebook page devoted to financial responsibility, payment plans, and insurance.

Discussing finances may initially make you feel uncomfortable. However, with the right strategies, you can conveniently and politely talk about payment options with patients. Make sure your staff also understands the importance of keeping patients updated.

5 Essential Business Planning Tips That Can Help Optometrists Survive a Recession.

Various small businesses could be severely hit by a recession. Proper planning is the key to long-term business success. And it becomes all the more important in the face of uncertain circumstances such as the ones we are facing currently.

Here are five essential business planning tips that every optometrist must follow if they wish to power through a recession and ensure sustained growth in the coming year.

1. Think Strategically

There are several strategic approaches that optometrists can benefit from. Strategic thinking is what helps you succeed in a competitive market. Businesses that don’t have a strategic plan in place are bound to have a hard time in fulfilling their short term as well as long term goals.

Take time to think about your business’s vision and mission. What is your unique selling proposition? How do your products and services differ from those of your competitors? Do you do any specialty care?

Focus on aspects that will prompt customers to choose your services over the alternative options.

2. Don’t Skip Marketing

Your revenues may be down these days, but that’s no reason to skip marketing. Marketing plays a key role in keeping your business in the public eye. You can cut down on the marketing budget if you want. But don’t forgo it altogether.

Identify the channels that can bring in the maximum customers and run your marketing campaigns on those platforms only. Staying active on social media is a great way to connect with your audience, so don’t forget to leverage that.

3. Form Alliances

One of the most strategic business planning tips in today’s economy is to form alliances. Collaborating with other optometry businesses operating both locally and other medical professionals can help you gain access to new streams of income. It can enable you to identify and exploit opportunities that still exist in an otherwise halted economy.

4. Sort Out Your Finances

Finances are the core element that determine the viability of your business plan. Make sure that you always have sufficient capital at hand for debt servicing, asset acquisition, business expansion, and the likes.

In addition to the current expenses, think about other costs you may incur down the lane.

5. Structure Your Workforce

You need to think about the future implications on your business in regards to your staff.

Will those employees be willing to rejoin when your business gains momentum again if you cut their hours? Do you want them to rejoin or wish to hire new workers instead? What are the skills you will need to keep your business running in a changing economy?

If you plan to hire new employees, make sure you have capital available for any training that may be required.

End Note

No one plans to fail; they fail to plan. So, follow these business planning tips to help your optometry business not just survive, but thrive regardless of how the economy may be performing.

Recipe for Success in Optometry: Grit and Resilience

Grit and resilience are key ingredients in the recipe of success. Humans possess a remarkable ability to work hard towards their goals and keep recovering from setbacks in the way.

You can succeed in your life and career as an optometrist once you understand the growth mindset and discover the power of grit and resilience. Keep reading to know how you can boost your resolve and keep setting and achieving high targets.

What is the Growth Mindset?

The Growth Mindset is a belief that you can achieve something once you acquire the skill to do so. Carol Dweck, an American psychologist, has identified two kinds of mindsets: fixed and growth.

A person with a fixed mindset believes that basic qualities are inherent and different ones cannot be developed. Growth mindset, on the other hand, dictates that you can enhance your qualities through efforts.

An individual may have a fixed mindset about some abilities and a growth mindset about others. For instance, a person may firmly believe that sketching well is a built-in talent that they cannot acquire. On the other hand, they may feel that they can improve in sports with enough practice.

It is imperative to approach your life and career with a growth mindset in order to succeed in your life and career as an optometrist. You may not have scored a high grade after studying optometry, but that doesn’t mean you cannot become a successful optometrist after gaining experience in the industry.

Developing Grit and Resilience

Grit implies resolve, and resilience refers to your ability to bounce back from a stressful situation. People who are able to grow are those who learn to overcome obstacles and setbacks. Here is how you can develop grit and resilience in your life and career as an optometrist:

1. Asses Yourself

Want to figure out how resilient you are? Take a quiz online to evaluate the extent to which you adhere to a growth mindset. Gauging you abilities will help you determine whether you are on the right track. If the results show that you have a growth mindset, work on enhancing it. In case you discover that you have a relatively rigid frame of mind, it is time to start taking corrective measures.

2. Stay Around Positive People

Your mindset helps define your life. Likewise, the thoughts and behavior of the people around you also influence your reality. You cannot always opt to be around the people of your choice, but you can selective about who you wish to spend most of your time with. Engage in productive discussions with fellow optometrists and keep in touch with your mentor in the field to stay motivated.

3. Set Goals

Grit involves maintaining interest and effort towards long-term goals. It can get difficult to make a lasting commitment, especially if you face several hurdles in the way. Nevertheless, it is important to remember that success comes to those who stay strong, even through times of crisis. Don’t shy away from ambitious targets. Work hard and persevere to make your mark in the field of optometry.

4. Celebrate Milestones

Success doesn’t always have to be measured in the form of outcomes. Sometimes, you make painstaking efforts, but victory gets delayed. Pat yourself on the back for the hard work and know that setbacks are always a possibility. Making efforts in the right direction will always be fruitful, even if it takes some time.

It takes time and effort to reach your goals and to stay strong in the face of obstacles. Once you adopt grit and resilience, you will understand that hard work always pays off. A positive and driven mindset will eventually bring success in your life and career as an optometrist.

5 Questions to Consider Before Buying Equipment

If you want to ensure your practice is a success, you’ll have to equip it with the best and the latest tools. If you don’t get the right tools to do the job, you may not be able to provide the value your patients expect. So, investing in the right tools is a part of ensuring success for your practice.

However, you’ll have to be careful when buying such equipment. If you aren’t as vigilant as you should be, you might get faulty equipment on your hands, which will affect the quality of patient care you provide. So, it’s better to ask yourself the following questions before buying any equipment for your practice.

1. How Will it Set My Practice Apart?

If you want the edge over other practices, you need to equip it with the modern tools that help you differentiate your practice. So, before purchasing any equipment, you need to ask yourself whether it will promote your practice and get you more patients? If you get a positive answer, by all means, purchase that equipment right away. As an optometrist, you need to offer your patients the best treatments that would require the appropriate tools.

2. Will My Patients be Appeased?

Most people these days have become super tech-friendly. They also hold those places that are pretty tech-savvy in high regard. So, will the equipment you’re about to invest in impress your patients? Will your entire practice make your patients feel comfortable? If yes, you should undoubtedly equip your practice with such tools. Whatever it takes to make your patients see the modernistic approach you’re taking with medicine, do it. As long as your patients are satisfied, you shouldn’t have a problem.

3. What More Do I Need?

You’re mistaken if you think your practice has all the necessary equipment and couldn’t need anything more. You might be forgetting something, whether it’s your firm’s digital presence, good word-of-mouth, or what matters the most – patients. You can always benefit from doing more. So, it’s better not to sustain by doing the bare minimum. Recognize what your practice needs, and give it to them to flourish and succeed even more. Develop a robust digital presence, employ software that helps with patient management, whatever it takes!

4. Return on Investment: Is It Enough?

When you’re setting up your practice, you’re investing in equipment you can only hope will provide you with long-term growth. It’s all hoping that you might get more significant returns by using modern technology on patients. So, they’ll know your practice is a class apart. However, are returns enough? Are you barely breaking even? You’ll have to make severe calculations to understand how much you will make in the upcoming months by investing in certain pieces of equipment.

5. How Can I Maximize the Equipment’s Full Potential?

When you’ve got the best equipment to boost your practice, it’s also necessary you use them in the right way. You’ll have to ensure you have the right staff who knows what they’re doing. You might have to provide training in the beginning to make them aware of how a specific piece of equipment is used. The more trained your staff is, the better they’ll be able to use the equipment.

How to Manage Entitled Employees

Entitled employees can be a pain for your office, mostly because they have this “we’re better than the
rest” attitude. Entitled employees can be from all stages of the career path. It’s one thing to be self-confident, but completely another to be entitled. These
employees expect to be treated much better than others, and that’s when the problem begins. It doesn’t matter if they work in a private practice, corporate practice or have completed a residency entitled employees need to be dealt with right away.


One thing to know about these entitled employees is their psychology works differently. Each must’ve
gone through something in their lives that triggered their superiority complex. Every employee’s reason
to be entitled varies according to the events in their lives.
Let’s go through what psychological entitlement is and how it can be dealt with.


What is Psychological Entitlement?
Psychological entitlement stems from an employee’s background and achievements. Some young ODs come out of

optometry school and feel like they can just walk into a practice and take over. The mindset that they are a Doctor

can provide that entailment factor. Many will have achieved great goals whether it be grades, residency or a family

member in the optical industry.

They start believing they’re better than everyone else and should be
treated differently, much better. Some things entitled employees ask for are more income right away, seeing less patients per hour, not working nights and weekends and making demands.


The mechanics behind psychological entitlement is rather complex yet simple. Anyone you meet exhibits
signs of entitlement would easily tell you how they’re raised. Yes, it has a lot to do with one’s brought
up. As stated earlier as well, the reasons behind entitlement vary. However, entitlement in the
workplace stirs a pot of politics, employee rivalry, and eventually, misconduct, which can become a pain
for the practice manager or owner.


Provide Constant Feedback

The first thing you need to realize as a manger is that you can’t change an entitled employee’s mindset. However, you can manage their behavior and even curb their entitlement.

You can do so by providing them constant feedback in a neutral manner that doesn’t set
them off. For example, you can call them and tell them about their good performance. Also, at the same
inform them about their shortcomings. This will balance your review, and you won’t come off as a bad.

Research states that employees tend to respond more rationally when they’re given a negative
review along with a positive one.

Monitor Their Behavior
Entitled employees need to be managed by checking their overall performance and their behavior
towards other employees. If an employee is entitled, chances are they’re going to flaunt their “I’m
better than you” attitude to others as well, and that’s not right.

All employees need to feel accepted,welcome, and most importantly, equal. If they feel that other employees are supposedly getting
preferential treatment, even if they’re not, it can negatively affect their productivity. Hence, as a
manager, you need to ensure such behavior is not enforced. It’s a big responsibility to manage all of
your employees and an even bigger responsibility to provide all employees with a sense of belonging.

Final Points
Entitlement is an issue that can make things worse for other people. When someone’s full of superiority
complex, they make others feel much less about them, and this doesn’t fare well for them. Hence, as a
manager, it’s up to you to ensure entitled employees keep such behaviors to themselves and not spread
them around the workplace. Entitled employees cause many issues in the practice, stop the issues before they get bigger!

Attracting Quality Talent in Optometry with Greater Transparency

Attracting quality talent entails optimizing your optometry practice in several ways. A focus on transparency and staff well-being will enable you to improve the profitability of your business in the long run.

Employees are more attracted towards practices that have a clear mission and adhere to their values. Here are 3 aspects that are of the utmost importance in hiring and retaining better talent.

1.      Develop good work culture

Work culture is an important part of an employee’s experience. Optometry practices usually focus on providing quality eye care, but their values and culture are hardly ever communicated.

Potential employees often research about a business before applying, making it a good idea to let them know what your practice values the most. For example, if teamwork is a key aspect for your practice, make that clear while you are hiring.

You can easily showcase the work culture of your optometry business on social media or within a job description. Doing so will help you attract employees who are more in line with your work objectives.

An important factor in attracting quality talent is building trust. It helps develop an open and transparent company culture to hire suitable people and retain suitable employees. Make sure you improve communication within your organization so that employees can easily connect with each other to share valuable information.

Prevent toxicity by openly discussing current challenges with employees and coming up with solutions as a team. Moreover, keep employees motivated by sharing and recognizing their achievements.

2.      Offer thorough training

No matter how experienced your employees are, it is crucial to provide them with training relevant to your optometry practice. Optometry is a specialized field where employees should have sufficient knowledge about different equipment and vision-related issues.

When your hire employees, make sure you offer on-the-job training to get them acclimatized to their new work environment. Provide systematic training for each job role in your organization. Untrained staff is likely to soon feel disinterested and demotivated.

You on-boarding program should ideally begin with an introduction of your practice’s basic mission, followed by specific training for staff members. You can introduce job shadowing and role-play exercises to get new recruits familiar with the ins and outs of your practice.  Also fine tune their people skills, so that they are able to deal with patients more effectively.

3.      Compensate suitably

Remuneration is one of the prime motivating factors for employees. Allocate a budget for staff compensation to help manage finances more effectively.

Recruiting and retaining quality employees requires providing employees with a satisfactory package. Compensation generally includes salaries, bonuses, commissions, and other benefits. Experienced workers and practitioners are aware of their value in the market and seek a salary that is worth their services.

Make sure you offer a suitable amount to potential employees in order to hire the best candidates for your optometry practice. Recruiting efficiently will lower hiring costs and spare time and money for other important tasks.

Attract quality talent towards your business by ensuring employee satisfaction. With a good work culture, proper training, and worthwhile compensation, you are sure to draw in and retain competent employees.

ABB Analyze, powered by Glimpse

April 19, 2021

Every practice’s data tells a story. Not just of where they’ve been, but where they’re going. That data can serve as the North Star, guiding the strategic direction of the practice. The planning that follows most often begins with evaluating previous performance, setting a goal, determining the activities in which to execute to achieve that goal, implementing those activities and adjusting along the way based on the results – rinse, repeat.

All the intricacies that make up the plan can be complex and of course, ever-changing. But those complications shouldn’t apply to the collecting, storing and organization of that data. That’s where ABB Analyze, powered by Glimpse comes in.

At ABB Analyze, our sole purpose is to help practices succeed by making business analytics simple. Created by private business owners looking to maximize their performance, ABB Analyze understands first-hand, the challenges of successfully managing a business.

The system is designed to be intuitive, customizable and readily available. We show you opportunities, areas of improvement and how you compare to your colleagues. Most importantly, we save practices time so you can focus on what should be your number one priority, your patients.

To get the most out of your practice, you need to get the most out of your data. ABB Analyze will provide a clearer pathway toward increasing revenues and practice success.

To learn more watch this 2 minute video

Now Available! ABB Analyze Lite – FREE Access to 9 Key Practice Metrics – Get Started Here!

Jeremy Bono – Sr. Technology Product Marketing Manager, ABB Optical Group