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Corporate Optometry Sponsored Blog Post: Introducing Transitions® Signature® GEN 8™ lenses

Patients want it all when it comes to adaptive lenses: ultimate eye protection, outdoor darkness, full indoor clarity, responsiveness and long-lasting performance—which Transitions Optical is delivering with their latest innovation, Transitions® Signature® GEN 8™ lenses.

To achieve the new frontier of performance desired by patients, Transitions Optical fully reinvented their photochromic system by combining a disruptive nanocomposite matrix with a new generation of ultra-agile dyes. This lens is the newest generation of Transitions Optical’s best-selling product and replaces Transitions® Signature® VII lenses.

Reasons to Recommend

Transitions Signature GEN 8 lenses push the limits of performance to satisfy existing photochromic lens wearers and recruit new clear lens wearers. Thanks to unprecedented patient research and product testing versus clear and other photochromic lenses, you can confidently tell patients that they will love Transitions Signature GEN 8 lenses.

  • Long lasting performance: Thanks to its ultra-agile dyes, Transitions Signature GEN 8 maintains a high level of performance even longer than Transitions Signature VII lenses, so patients can get the most out of their lenses[i].
  • Ultimate protection: Give patients comfortable vision and hassle-free protection with Transitions Signature GEN 8, which block 100% UVA and UVB rays and help filter 87% of harmful blue light outdoors and at least 20% indoors[ii].
  • Activation speed: The breakthrough technology of Transitions Signature GEN 8 lenses provides a 30% faster activation rate than Transitions Signature VII lenses[iii]. Now that’s Light Under Control™!
  • Fade back and indoor clarity: No matter your patient’s lifestyle, they can count on their lenses to adapt quickly indoors. In fact, Transitions Signature GEN 8 lenses fade back to clear three minutes faster[iv] than Transitions Signature VII lenses.
  • Darkness: Transitions Signature GEN 8 lenses are even darker than Transitions Signature VII lenses[v], giving your patients the ultimate eye protection in the brightest sun.

Proven Benefits

With nine out of 10 eyeglass wearers declaring they are light sensitive[vi], there’s a huge opportunity for eyecare professionals to recommend a light management solution. Rely on a lens that’s proven to reducehow often wearers experience light sensitivity, by prescribing Transitions Signature GEN 8 lenses. In fact, after wearing Transitions Signature GEN 8 lenses, eight out of 10 wearers were less bothered by bright light and changing light[vii]

Learn more about why Transitions Signature GEN 8 is the best overall photochromic lens[viii] and download your in-practice resources by visiting www.TransitionsPRO.com/GEN8.


[i] Lab measurement ISO standard @ 23 C / T=% Transmission.  Based on lab accelerated aging test where one cycle approximates 2 years average usage.

[ii] Harmful blue light is calculated between 380nm and 460nm, across materials and colors.

[iii] CR607 products activate to a category 3 darkness 15% faster. Claim is based on tests across materials on gray lenses, being the most popular color, achieving 18% transmission @ 23°C.

[iv] CR607 products fade back to clear 2 minutes faster. Claim is based on tests across materials on gray lenses, being the most popular color, fading back to 70%transmission @ 23°C.

[v] Lab measurement ISO standard @ 23 C / T=% Transmission.

[vi] Transitions Optical Life360™ live wearers testing in US, France, China (IFOP 2016/2017). N=117 eyeglass wearers.

[vii] Transitions Signature GEN 8 Wearers Test, Nationwide US, Kadence, Q1 2019.

[viii] Based on achieving the highest weighted composite score among main everyday photochromic lenses across measurements of key photochromic performance attributes weighted by their relative importance to consumers.

The Growth Potential of a Sublease in Corporate Optometry.

Corporate Opticals and Optometrists can have a mutually successful business, with each party focusing on their strengths. Optometrists tend to give priority to the needs of our patients forgetting that we are a business that needs to be profitable as well. To make sure that our practice remains successful some ODs have partnered with corporate opticals.

Optometrist enjoy is diagnosing, treating and serving their patients, but running a business is in some ways is something completely different. Opportunities need to be recognized and captured while managing risks along the way. Corporate optometry can be a great way to practice the way you want and have your own business with minimal risk practicing next to a corporate optical.

Optometry is still divided and many ODs underestimate the potential of a successful business and career in corporate optometry. Usually, some private practices have a heavy flow of cash but they lack effective management. Corporate opticals understand that there is a possible opportunity there but with a small manageable risk factor. Optometrists can capture the same opportunities that opticals recognize and benefit from. All we need to do is, think outside the box, and apply business strategies, like a CEO. Everyone has the potential to unleash the CEO from within.

We need to change our perspective in the following ways:

Prepare a Business Plan

Just as a you would set up a business plan for a private practice, write up a business plan for the corporate location. Have the regional manager and store manager provide you with information on the business metrics to help you set up your plan. Construct a plan for a few years to build and grow the business.

Value Growth

Optometrists sometimes overestimate their corporate practices. The wiliness of the number of ODs to take over your sublease defines its value. We need to build value in our practice by spotting growth opportunities. Corporate opticals see that they can expand with strong management, overall services, budget control, objectives, and vision. Having that partner will help grow your value in your sublease as well has expanding to the medical model.

Seek Potential

Corporate opticals expand rapidly in urban and rural areas. In over saturated areas patients get divided and there is a huge risk of your practice to fail. Partnering with the right corporate optical that has a unique value proposition, your sublease can be very successful even in the most competitive areas. Rural areas and places where there are underprivileged people need more medical attention can be a lucrative business for an OD with minimal rent and less competition.

Look at the Bigger Picture

Optometrists shouldn’t miss opportunities in corporate optometry because of what they hear. Think bigger. Many corporate opticals have a diverse portfolio and have different brands, unique products, services and insurance plans to attract and retain patients. A sublease owner can be comfortable that in competitive markets that these factors with help keep their sublease successful as well.

In conclusion, corporate optometry can provide great benefits to an optometrist that would like to go down the path of a practice owner but not have all the risks that a private practice does.

Thinking Outside the Box in Optometry

Who hasn’t heard the phrase, and at least once been told at some point in their life or another to ‘think outside the box.’

And if you are an optometrist, it is highly likely that you complain a lot about how tough your field is, how hard it is to handle the business of vision and eye care, how many patients you have to see, etc.

Whether you are a new OD, or someone who has been practicing eye care for a long time, you are likely to have felt bored or stressed with your work recently.

Read on to find out how you can ease your task and create opportunities for yourself in the field of optometry, and why those glasses belong well beyond their glass box.

What is your box?

Find out what bothers you most about your work. Obviously, no one can be the best at everything. Find inspiration to think creatively.

Self-reflect and evaluate yourself to pinpoint your strengths and weaknesses. And if you need help with that, certain assessment tools can you help you.

Evaluate other health care industries

Evaluate what other health care professionals are doing. We all face the same dilemmas as health care professionals. Understand how dental has dealt with Medicare and dental plans. Learn how other professionals dealt with increase competition, increase costs and changing industries. Use that knowledge to do something differently in optometry.

Redefine your box

Once you are self-aware of what you have and what you lack, take the required steps to help you shine. Flex your brain muscle to think creative ways it usually does not. Some people can have the best ideas in the morning over coffee while others are later at night when the day is done. Figure out when is the best time to tackle your box.  All your ideas don’t have to be the best but writing done many ideas can help lead to the best innovate idea.

If you are an OD and dislike working in on setting, perhaps consider a different setting in optometry? Or if you dislike your current responsibilities but overall like the field nonetheless, perhaps you need to reconsider your role.

In optometry, you can be an employee, an associate OD, a leaseholder, a contractor, or even a franchise holder depending on your goals and preferences.

Ask questions on how you can do things differently to “redefine your box”. Different perspectives can produce different outcomes. The eye care industry is a growing industry seeing the opportunities that others don’t can differentiate yourself from others.

If it’s your business you worry about, perhaps you need to increase your outreach. Ensure proper and appropriate marketing to build a customer base. Find ways to develop trust and loyalty with your patients so that your service speaks for itself.

If you are a new OD and it’s your limited skills that seem to be bothering you, then you should enroll in specialization courses or pursue further studies. Increasing your knowledge is always the best way to widen your horizons and discover not just the world around you, but also your own self.

And if you are an old practitioner, you should still delve deep into learning about the latest trends and technology and treatment methodologies in eye care. This will keep you up to date with the fast changing today’s world.

So, just clear up your mind, and with a bit of practice and the right attitude, you can think outside the box (or look beyond the lenses; whichever works best), to excel your career in optometry.

How to Target the Most wanted Subleases In Corporate Optometry

How to target the most wanted Subleases in Corporate Optometry.

You know you want to work in a corporate optical which aligns with your goals and will allow you to excel in your career.  You want to have the best most profit sublease. How can you determine which are the best? Word of mouth? The Corporate Optometry FB group?

Here is the simple solution you need to find the right fit: target the most wanted subleases in corporate optometry.

This, however, is not as straightforward as it sounds. Targeting companies requires more than just searching for the top-performing companies. Many ODs look for a sublease with Warby Parker or  Costco . 

Follow the easy guide below to learn the proper way to target the most wanted corporate optometry subleases.

1. List your targets

You can use a variety of different ways to research corporate optometry subleases.

Use various channels of communication, such as asking your colleagues and using the Facebook group Corporate Optometry. Inquire which sublease they think is the most in demand and the reasons why they think so. This allows you to personalize your search and get your queries answered directly.

Also, try to meet people who work for a company that interests you. Find out what they think of the place and if it’s the right place for a fresh OD to start their practice or for a contractor to sublease it.

You should build your contacts through a social media platform, especially by being active on avenues where professionals from the field of optometry interact and discuss workplace matters.

2. Know your targets

Once you have listed the most wanted subleases in corporate optometry, the next step is to learn more about them.

Explore important information, such as: what does the target company value the most? What are the factors that make it better or worse than other companies? Are there any issues that your target company is facing at the moment, and if yes, how can you help them solve it?

Reach out to regional managers and recruiters on Linkedin and let them know you are interested in a potential sublease. Let them know you are more than qualified to handle a busy practice and have a business plan ready to illustrate what your plans are.

3. Meet your targets

After you are done looking into your targets, the next step is to find out if your target company is willing to offer you a sublease

Check out each target company’s website, their reviews and overall performance indicators. You can also directly correspond with them via email or schedule a face-to-face meeting.

By applying these three steps to your search for the best corporate optometry sublease, you can make yourself visible and appear brighter to these firms. So, whenever they are hiring or looking to sublease, they know whom to contact.

The sooner you start targeting, the more likely you are to hit the target just right.

Signs Your Body Gives You When You have Optometry Burnout

Optometry is a promising field, but like all other professions, it comes with its own challenges and difficulties.

Holding down a job in optometry is not an easy task. You have to meet many requirements, fulfill a certain criteria, serve a large number of patients, work continuously for long hours as well as work alongside people you may not necessarily like. Also, when it comes to optometry,

many people are doing jobs that they perhaps didn’t even want to do in the first place but are doing so because of a lack of options or other similar reason. Thus, burnout in optometry is not a new phenomenon, but despite being so common, many optometrists are unable to identify whether they are experiencing burnout or just temporary tiredness.

Doing something that you are not satisfied with for a long period of time is not only emotionally exhausting, but it can also affect you mentally as well as physically. Take a look at the following signs of optometrist burnout so that you can take the required action before it becomes too late.

You Feel Extremely Exhausted

Continuing to work at a job that stresses you out will lead to chronic fatigue. This means that whether you get 8 hours of sleep or not, your exhaustion won’t go away. You might think that the upcoming weekend or a short break from work will refresh and re-energize you but that ‘next’ break just doesn’t arrive. Weariness becomes your ally and you are likely to fell drained out and lethargic most of the time.

Headaches Become Frequent

Do you think it’s that late night Sunday party that’s causing you that headache? Or that the back pain you are feeling is because you have to sit at a desk from 9 to 5?

If you experience headaches, shoulder pain, back pain or any other pain frequently without doing any rigorous exercises or other physically exhaustive tasks, then it’s your body’s way of saying that you are experiencing burnout in optometry. This is because extreme stress decreases the production of dopamine and keeps your muscles tightened which ultimately leads to physical pain.

You Turn Insomniac

Sleepless nights or having trouble falling asleep even when you feel very tired is one of the most prominent signs of burnout. This can happen due to various reasons. For instance, if your job is too demanding, then you might be fearful of falling short and not being able to complete the required tasks on time. Or if you wanted to be a full-time OD but are instead stuck in a minor role in corporate optometry then, needless to say, feeling a lack of accomplishment will keep you up at night.

Other Signs

Apart from these, common signs of burnout include stomach aches as well as nausea, vomiting or even diarrhea in extreme cases. Moreover, excessive stress can lower your immunity, making you more susceptible to common cold, flu, and other common viruses.

Burnout in healthcare workers is a serious issue. So, if you are experiencing burnout in optometry, make sure to take a step back, evaluate, prioritize or re-prioritize things and take action if it’s time to consider a new job.

Routine vs Medical

Whether you have been practicing optometry for quite some time now or are about to enter the field soon, you would know how important it is to satisfy patients in terms of eye care and the overall service you provide.

And a major difficulty faced by ODs and optometrists worldwide is when their patients can’t understand why their visit is being billed when they have insurance or when their examination is called ‘routine’ and when it is ‘medical.’

Apart from customer satisfaction, what lies between your optometry practice being profitable and incurring revenue losses is to know when an examination is routine or medical and therefore, bill it accordingly.

While customers are normally confused between the two types of exams, a part of the confusion stems from doctors themselves.

When the ODs and the staff are clear and confident about the services they provide only then can they can satisfy their patients better.

What is a routine exam?

A patient’s exam will be considered routine if there is no emergency or chief compliant behind their reason to visit. If they don’t have a history of any major eye illness or disease, the diagnosis involves low to no decision making or the primary diagnosis is refractive in nature, then the examination will be considered routine.

What is a medical exam?

Unlike a routine exam, a medical exam requires some important decision-making. There is usually a chief complaint or some other ailment that compels the patient to visit an optometrist.

If the medical diagnosis correlates with their complaint or even if there is no apparent reason but the patient has a history of some ocular disease then their examination will be marked as a medical exam.

It goes without saying that everyone wants to save money. Therefore, most patients want to use their routine benefits in order to save what they can. But being an experienced practitioner, if you deem the exam to be medical then it is necessary to explain to the patient why you will be billing their medical insurance.

You need to handle such situations well because it shows to customers that you provide a higher level of eye care than they might have imagined.

It is best you sort things out as early as when a patient calls or visits to book an appointment.

Ask them if they have any medical condition such as diabetes, hypertension.

Diabetes is amongst the leading causes of blindness, so in case a patient is diabetic, let them know that their exam will be considered medical.

Also, ask the patients about their insurance details so that you can decide whether they are eligible for bill reductions or not.

Suggest if they require an OCT scan or a retinal photo and confirm their eligibility for different eye-health benefits.

Give your patients an intake form that explains when an examination is routine and medical.

Ask them to carefully read it and then sign and submit it to you before the exam.

This shows that they acknowledge their understanding of routine and health insurance benefits and how these benefits can be utilized.

The Opportunity for Personal Development for ODs in Corporate Optometry

“Income seldom exceeds personal development.”

Corporate Optometry is indeed a promising field, especially in terms of monetary gain. Of course you would know this if you have been a Corporate OD  or even if you are about to graduate from a school of optometry soon. The ‘bright’ future that this path offers is likely to have been a major factor that motivated you to pursue a career in corporate optometry.

But whether you feel you have gained sufficient knowledge during optometry school, or have been successfully practicing and think you know enough, you must remember that optometry is an evolving profession and they is always room for growth. You should always what to learn and seek more.

If you want to grow in corporate optometry you must find resources to develop yourself. There are a lot of practice management and clinical resources but there should be more on leadership, career advancement and extending personal goals.

Embrace the challenges!

To ensure success in your work, you must develop the ability to perform well under pressure. Many Corporate ODs see a large number of patients and the long work hours with fewer holidays that come with this career choice. Even if you are stressed out in the beginning, allow yourself to embrace the challenge and meet the requirements of your work head-on. Not only will you soon adjust, but you will also learn to manage and cope with all the pressure at work.The key is to maintain a positive attitude. Eat healthy and do exercise regularly and perhaps yoga or meditation as well, since they are proven to promote a healthy mind.

And no matter what happens, remember it is the obstacles that create personal growth.

Learn, learn, and learn!

Continue expanding your knowledge about optometry and the key treatments and procedures in the industry. Step of the corporate OD island and meet other ODs that practice with the same company and expand outside that network as well. Engage in healthy discussions on important topics in your field.

Joining the Facebook group Corporate Optometry can provide continuing personal development as they often provide not just the best practical methods, but also teach management and other key life skills that other corporate ODs face.

Self Reflect

Self-reflect and evaluate your career goals and want you want to achieve in a reasonable time frame and make any appropriate adjustments as required. This will be of great benefit to not only those around you but to you yourself as well. You must continue to expand your interests, and shape, improve and develop your skills and knowledge, in order to advance your optometric career and become the OD that you always envisioned in yourself.

Self Reflection should be done on short term and long term goals evaluating your failures and re-framing them to continue to grow!

With the right polishing, not just the glasses but you can shine as well!

Characteristics of an Excellent Regional Manager in Corporate Optometry

Characteristics of Excellent Regional Managers in Corporate Optometry

Trust

They respect what ODs do and encourage ODs to practice the way they choose to. Don’t interfere with OD business. They understand that in order the optical to grow the OD side of the business needs to grow as well.

Work-Life Balance

They promote work life balance. They know that people work better and collaborate more if there is a balance. Burn out in corporate optometry is real.  Promoting a work life balance can help off set the burn out. Happy ODs can focus on growing a business and will result in increase in optical revenue.

Alignment

Keep optical staff focused on long term goals that includes growing the Doctor side of the business. Great regional managers understand the the patient experience is not an optical sale. Working with the Doctor side of the business will promote eye health and an image to the patient to continue to see the OD at that location. In the long term the patient that continues their care with that OD is more likely to continue to purchase from that optical. It can hedge from online retailers.

Support

Recognize and reward the optical staff and OD. Without the team goals can’t be achieved.

They encourage growth and want to see the OD business succeed. In the long term it will benefit the optical.

They won’t sacrifice the Doctor’s business to grow their own. Regional managers will not influence ODs office to offer quick services or cheapest eye exam in the area. They recognize this tactic will not grow the business in the long run.

Create a Culture of Accountability

They understand each location has unique strengths and weaknesses and use those intuition to create a strategic plan.

Provide resources to improve optical performance and find solutions. They do not blame.

When something goes wrong great regional managers work with the optical team and OD. They are accountable for their own results.

 

CREATING A MEMORABLE EXPERIENCE IN CORPORATE OPTOMETRY

Creating a Memorable experience in Corporate Optometry.

When you think of  memorable experiences you think of positive times filled with joy and laughter. It could be a game winning shot, a vacation, childhood memory of your parents or even just enjoying a loved ones company as laughter fills the room.  You tend to remember the times that you felt something. Creating a memorable patient experience is no different! The way a patient “feels” about the experience will reflect directly to your bottom line. People will generally really love something or not like it and there is no room for in between or being average in today’s competitive market.  Creating a memorable experience involves everyone through the patient journey. Think of a patient experience as a journey, it is not a single appointment or transaction but a journey that can evolve over the next 20-30 years as they continue to see you and refer others to your office.   Here are some ways to make a memorable patient experience:

1. Active Listening

Active Listening is paying attention to the patient from the moment they call for an appointment. Train your staff to take notes during the initial touch point. If a patient is calling the office because of having a negative experience at another office, have the staff ask probing questions to understand what type of experience they are looking for. Once the patient is in your exam chair you have a “blueprint” of their expectations. You are able to address their pain points that guided them to your office.  Provide a personal approach by facing  them when they are talking and maintain eye contact. Many times patients will tell you want they want, it is your job as an eye care professional to recommend the best options and help guide them to best personalized solution. Active listening establishes  the patient/ doctor relationship and aligns an active approach to their health care. If they feel like their part of the decision process it will create a memorable experience that will make your office stand out from the rest.

2. Doctor Driven Dispensing

Whether you own your office or are an employee, doctor driven dispensing is a way to not only to create a memorable experience in the optical, but create patient loyalty through patient education of products. The clinical findings from the examination should be aligned with the eye wear lenses options that you recommend, to the specific artificial tears that you prescribed to that patient. It goes back to active listening. You are the authoritative voice and experienced professional of that office, “customize” and educate patients to why you are recommending a product and how it is different from online retailers. Maintain eye contact when discussing personalized eye care. Doctor driven dispensing is an art that is frequently ignored by many ODs. Asking different questions will create a “wow” experience for the patient, ” they never asked me those questions before, maybe I wasn’t getting the right exam or eye wear that I should have had before”

3.  Storytelling

Storytelling can be an influential connector to your patients because it is an emotional driver. Memorable moments are created by emotions. It makes the patient experience a human experience. Storytelling can be formulated from active listening to understanding what the patient likes to talk about and transitioning it to an assessment/plan strategy for that patient encounter.  Storytelling by itself can be a powerful way to be memorable. Be yourself. Being authentic will connect with people. Letting them know that your family member has a the same issues with  progressive lenses and what specific product you prescribed compared to an affordable option creates more value for your office than competing on price.

4. Marketing a memorable experience

Online retailers like Warby Parker will donate a pair of glasses. It creates a memorable experience for the patient because they know that their eyeglass purchase with help others in need. The promotion is “Since day one, over 4 million pairs of glasses have been distributed through our Buy a Pair, Give a Pair program. Alleviating the problem of impaired vision is at the heart of what we do, and with your help, our impact continues to expand.” The key phrase is “The whole story begins with you“, it creates a memorable experience where the patient is involved in something for a bigger purpose. Whether is is a local charity event or mission trip your office can do the same. Use your email database and social media platforms to educate your patients about your involvement in the community and how they can be involved by donating old glasses or how you can do a promotion for free eye exams for those in need through your office.

 5. Follow up

The patient experience does not end at the end of the exam.  Making a follow up call to a patient can make a lasting impression. Whether is it a follow up on corneal abrasion or a call to see how their contacts are performing. This discussion has more impact than you think in making your business successful and developing the critical doctor/patient relationship. Following up 1 week, 1 month or 6 months will create a memorable experience, simply set reminders in your EMR system to have your staff follow up on progressive adaptation or simple satisfaction with service or products. Let your patients know that you remember specific personal information, document in your chart; job information and children’s names to have a starting point for your next exam.  Your EMR system can be a great way to follow up on reactivating patients by sending birthday texts/emails with special promotions.

6.Unique Style

Your unique style makes you memorable. Humor is a memorable factor. Don’t be afraid to have a different approach to patient care, humor will make you likeable and approachable to new patients. You want patients to feel comfortable, being funny is one way to do it. Everyone likes getting compliments and it will also make people feel comfortable to ask questions and enhance the doctor/patient experience.

Your personality, humor,empathy, attention to detail is your signature to the world. It speaks volumes, use it to create a memorable experience that no one can mimic because “you” is UNIQUE.

Learn more about Life Insurance

What is Life Insurance?

Life insurance is an important part of the financial planning portfolio and something every individual should have at some point of their life. Coverage can vary in values, options and legalities, but its purpose is always meant to provide for dependents in the event of death.

There are two types of Life Insurance policies: Term Life and Permanent Life. Within permanent life, there is Whole Life and Universal Life.

A Term Life Insurance policy is the period of time during which the coverage is guaranteed to remain in place. Terms can range from one year to thirty years and many numbers in-between. The years of the term specifies that the premium (cost) will remain level for the term specified and as long as the premiums are paid, the coverage will pay out the death benefit.

Whole Life Insurance is a type of permanent coverage that provides coverage for the entire lifetime of a life insured, with a premium that remains level over the course of the contract. Whole Life builds up a cash value over time, and the policyholder can use that value towards future premiums or as a means of accessing cash later down the road.

Universal Life Insurance is also a type of permanent coverage. It allows the policy to act as an investment and a way to tax shelter money as one can invest more than the basic premium into this policy and have their investment grow in a tax-sheltered vehicle.

This is a very basic description to help one begin to understand life insurance and its importance. For more information, please contact

Samuel Waxman, CFP, CLU, CHS 416.817.8897 samuelwaxman@millennialfg.com 201-515 Consumers Road, Toronto, Ontario, M2J 4Z2 millennialfinancialgroup.com

Podcast

Corporate Optometry in India Part 1

With about 450 million people needing vision correction, uncorrected refractive error accounts for over 50% of vision impairment in India. Optometry is yet an unregulated profession. Defocus Media and Corporate Optometry Nation would like to present a podcast with Ms. Ukti Vora, an Indian optometrist who shares details about the history and growth of Optometry in India post the launch of ‘Vision 2020 – Right For Sight’ program.

She provides insights about how optometry is practiced differently in India compared to major countries like USA and Australia. Optometrists in India are exploring different ways to deal with major competitors like Lenskart and Titan Eye Plus. Lack of regulation affects the policies for insurance and law in India. Efforts by various organization like Optometry Council of India (OCI), Associations of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO), Indian Optometry Federation (IOF) and ‘Let’s RevolutionarEyes’ are contributing towards promoting and regularizing the profession. Organizations like MasterClass Optometry are promoting quality CME for practicing optometrists. India, still a developing market, has tremendous opportunities for collaboration in academics, research and corporate world. Ukti shares her experience and knowledge over the years to bring us closer to understanding optometry in India.

What Failure Can Teach You that Success Can’t

Corporate Optometry Nation partners with the Primary Eye Guys on this podcast. They discuss how their failures have shaped them. Learn to embrace failure in your career in optometry. The best lessons are the ones you learn from putting in the work and being able to continue despite the failures.

Creative Marketing with Dr Asma Alsalameh

Dr Asma Alsalmeh sits down with the Corporate Optometry nation podcast to discuss creative marketing techniques to grow your optometric practice in corporate optometry. Being a sublease OD has its advantages with the corporate optical having the ability to market at a high level. Many corporate opticals will only advertise materials and promotions but not the eye exam. As a business owner you need to acknowledge that marketing is an investment in your practice not an expense. Listen in to the newest podcast to learn how this OD took a new sublease and found opportunities to expand her business with creative marketing techniques at an affordable price!

Corporate Optometry with Dr Ken Kopolow

Corporate Optometry Nation Podcast interviews Dr Ken Kopolow. Dr Kopolow has many locations within Luxottica. He has Pearle Vision franchises and subleases at Lenscrafters in Nevada. We talk about how to manage multiple locations and how to achieve financial success in corporate optometry. There are many differences between franchising in corporate optometry and subleasing. Listen in to learn more!

Mothers in Optometry: Interview with Dr. Carla Gasparini

Corporate Optometry Nation Podcast Mothers Day edition. Dr Maria Sampalis interviewed Dr Carla Gasparini, who has two Walmart locations in Austin Texas. Walmart has been a great partner for her. She discusses how she balances a family and being self employed. She gives great advice on how to grow a business and balance it all. Listen in to the very inspiring story how this female entrepreneur is doing it all.    She discusses how her corporate optometry office provides medical eye care . Being a mom and being self employed has been  a great career move for Dr Gasparini listen in to learn how you can do it as well.

Episode 2: 1099 vs. W-2: How Independent Contractors and Employees Differ

1099 vs W2:How Independent Contractor and Employees Differ.

Many Optometrists graduate from Optometry school and choose corporate optometry either as a W2 or 1099. Many ODs will do Fill in work as a 1099. Many  Independent Contractors will be paid more but it comes with a cost due to taxes.

Listen to the podcast  to find out tax tips, W2 vs 1099, quick books, being self employed in optometry and how to use technology to lower your tax bracket. Student loans are a big financial burden for optometrist. Read more about student loans and how to tackle them at Corporate OD. We talk about student loans and how to slash them and how to use them as a tax deduction.

Corporate Optometry has partnered with SoFi to offer our members and their families a $150 welcome bonus2 upon refinancing their student or Parent PLUS loans through SoFi.com/CorporateOptometry.

 

Listen to more podcasts at Defocus Media.