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How to Manage Entitled Employees

Entitled employees can be a pain for your office, mostly because they have this “we’re better than the
rest” attitude. Entitled employees can be from all stages of the career path. It’s one thing to be self-confident, but completely another to be entitled. These
employees expect to be treated much better than others, and that’s when the problem begins. It doesn’t matter if they work in a private practice, corporate practice or have completed a residency entitled employees need to be dealt with right away.


One thing to know about these entitled employees is their psychology works differently. Each must’ve
gone through something in their lives that triggered their superiority complex. Every employee’s reason
to be entitled varies according to the events in their lives.
Let’s go through what psychological entitlement is and how it can be dealt with.


What is Psychological Entitlement?
Psychological entitlement stems from an employee’s background and achievements. Some young ODs come out of

optometry school and feel like they can just walk into a practice and take over. The mindset that they are a Doctor

can provide that entailment factor. Many will have achieved great goals whether it be grades, residency or a family

member in the optical industry.

They start believing they’re better than everyone else and should be
treated differently, much better. Some things entitled employees ask for are more income right away, seeing less patients per hour, not working nights and weekends and making demands.


The mechanics behind psychological entitlement is rather complex yet simple. Anyone you meet exhibits
signs of entitlement would easily tell you how they’re raised. Yes, it has a lot to do with one’s brought
up. As stated earlier as well, the reasons behind entitlement vary. However, entitlement in the
workplace stirs a pot of politics, employee rivalry, and eventually, misconduct, which can become a pain
for the practice manager or owner.


Provide Constant Feedback

The first thing you need to realize as a manger is that you can’t change an entitled employee’s mindset. However, you can manage their behavior and even curb their entitlement.

You can do so by providing them constant feedback in a neutral manner that doesn’t set
them off. For example, you can call them and tell them about their good performance. Also, at the same
inform them about their shortcomings. This will balance your review, and you won’t come off as a bad.

Research states that employees tend to respond more rationally when they’re given a negative
review along with a positive one.

Monitor Their Behavior
Entitled employees need to be managed by checking their overall performance and their behavior
towards other employees. If an employee is entitled, chances are they’re going to flaunt their “I’m
better than you” attitude to others as well, and that’s not right.

All employees need to feel accepted,welcome, and most importantly, equal. If they feel that other employees are supposedly getting
preferential treatment, even if they’re not, it can negatively affect their productivity. Hence, as a
manager, you need to ensure such behavior is not enforced. It’s a big responsibility to manage all of
your employees and an even bigger responsibility to provide all employees with a sense of belonging.

Final Points
Entitlement is an issue that can make things worse for other people. When someone’s full of superiority
complex, they make others feel much less about them, and this doesn’t fare well for them. Hence, as a
manager, it’s up to you to ensure entitled employees keep such behaviors to themselves and not spread
them around the workplace. Entitled employees cause many issues in the practice, stop the issues before they get bigger!

Attracting Quality Talent in Optometry with Greater Transparency

Attracting quality talent entails optimizing your optometry practice in several ways. A focus on transparency and staff well-being will enable you to improve the profitability of your business in the long run.

Employees are more attracted towards practices that have a clear mission and adhere to their values. Here are 3 aspects that are of the utmost importance in hiring and retaining better talent.

1.      Develop good work culture

Work culture is an important part of an employee’s experience. Optometry practices usually focus on providing quality eye care, but their values and culture are hardly ever communicated.

Potential employees often research about a business before applying, making it a good idea to let them know what your practice values the most. For example, if teamwork is a key aspect for your practice, make that clear while you are hiring.

You can easily showcase the work culture of your optometry business on social media or within a job description. Doing so will help you attract employees who are more in line with your work objectives.

An important factor in attracting quality talent is building trust. It helps develop an open and transparent company culture to hire suitable people and retain suitable employees. Make sure you improve communication within your organization so that employees can easily connect with each other to share valuable information.

Prevent toxicity by openly discussing current challenges with employees and coming up with solutions as a team. Moreover, keep employees motivated by sharing and recognizing their achievements.

2.      Offer thorough training

No matter how experienced your employees are, it is crucial to provide them with training relevant to your optometry practice. Optometry is a specialized field where employees should have sufficient knowledge about different equipment and vision-related issues.

When your hire employees, make sure you offer on-the-job training to get them acclimatized to their new work environment. Provide systematic training for each job role in your organization. Untrained staff is likely to soon feel disinterested and demotivated.

You on-boarding program should ideally begin with an introduction of your practice’s basic mission, followed by specific training for staff members. You can introduce job shadowing and role-play exercises to get new recruits familiar with the ins and outs of your practice.  Also fine tune their people skills, so that they are able to deal with patients more effectively.

3.      Compensate suitably

Remuneration is one of the prime motivating factors for employees. Allocate a budget for staff compensation to help manage finances more effectively.

Recruiting and retaining quality employees requires providing employees with a satisfactory package. Compensation generally includes salaries, bonuses, commissions, and other benefits. Experienced workers and practitioners are aware of their value in the market and seek a salary that is worth their services.

Make sure you offer a suitable amount to potential employees in order to hire the best candidates for your optometry practice. Recruiting efficiently will lower hiring costs and spare time and money for other important tasks.

Attract quality talent towards your business by ensuring employee satisfaction. With a good work culture, proper training, and worthwhile compensation, you are sure to draw in and retain competent employees.

ABB Analyze, powered by Glimpse

April 19, 2021

Every practice’s data tells a story. Not just of where they’ve been, but where they’re going. That data can serve as the North Star, guiding the strategic direction of the practice. The planning that follows most often begins with evaluating previous performance, setting a goal, determining the activities in which to execute to achieve that goal, implementing those activities and adjusting along the way based on the results – rinse, repeat.

All the intricacies that make up the plan can be complex and of course, ever-changing. But those complications shouldn’t apply to the collecting, storing and organization of that data. That’s where ABB Analyze, powered by Glimpse comes in.

At ABB Analyze, our sole purpose is to help practices succeed by making business analytics simple. Created by private business owners looking to maximize their performance, ABB Analyze understands first-hand, the challenges of successfully managing a business.

The system is designed to be intuitive, customizable and readily available. We show you opportunities, areas of improvement and how you compare to your colleagues. Most importantly, we save practices time so you can focus on what should be your number one priority, your patients.

To get the most out of your practice, you need to get the most out of your data. ABB Analyze will provide a clearer pathway toward increasing revenues and practice success.

To learn more watch this 2 minute video

Now Available! ABB Analyze Lite – FREE Access to 9 Key Practice Metrics – Get Started Here!

Jeremy Bono – Sr. Technology Product Marketing Manager, ABB Optical Group

4 Ways to differentiate yourself in Optometry

Optometry school may have equipped you with all the technical knowledge and expertise you need, but did you know that this alone does not a great optometrist make?

Read on as we take a look at some of the things they should be teaching you in optometry school, but don’t.

Listening to patients

This may seem like an obvious one, but you’d be surprised to know that some medical professionals don’t truly listen to what patients are trying to tell them.

Each patient is different. Rushing through appointments isn’t going to do anyone any good. As an optometrist, you owe it to patients to give them your time and respect.

After all, hearing out a patient is integral to determining what is troubling them, and coming through with the correct diagnosis.

A good place to start the conversation would be finding out what the patient in question does for a living. This can help you gather basic insights into the kind of lifestyle they lead, and reach a more informed place before treating them.

Managing inventory

The importance of this simply can not be stressed enough, especially considering current pandemic times.

You can be almost certain that the equipment you need, or the medicine you require is either in short supply, or is not going to be delivered on time.

It would thus be prudent to be proactive and take out the time to figure out all that you might be needing to ensure the smooth running of your practice.

Dealing with numbers

No matter what your profession, it would serve you well to follow these words of wisdom to a tee.

It’s important to understand that at the end of the day, you’re running a business. While it’s understandable that as an optometrist, you may want to focus on treating patients while hiring someone else to deal with the monetary side of things, you must set aside a bit of time poring over orders, receipts, and invoices.

No one’s asking you to do a deep-dive, but it will only benefit you and your practice if you’re aware of some basics: service rates by the hour, supply pricing, and how to avail the benefits of loyalty programs offered by various companies.

Managing staff

People management is not as simple as it’s deemed to be. It is, in fact, one of the more challenging aspects to running a practice.

Any practice that is running like a well-oiled machine is sure to have an efficient, meticulous team working behind the scenes.

Maintain employee motivation by empowering them, trusting them, and granting them due recognition for their efforts.

A good way to go about this is by first trying to gauge how good they are at making decisions. To do this, you don’t necessarily have to entrust them with a task; you can start by having routine discussions at the clinic to see where everyone stands.

The tactics mentioned above will help add value to your practice, and even guarantee long-term success.

3 Important KPIs to Improve Your Optometry Practice

If you run an optometry practice, you have to worry about your patients’ eye health and, on top of that, manage resources, improve productivity, and ensure profitability. Key performance indicators (KPIs) are essential factors to consider when analyzing your practice.

By monitoring KPIs, one can assess where their practice is lacking, what needs to be improved, and what redundancies need to be addressed. This leads towards a more growth-oriented optometry practice and ensures a patient-centric model of operation.

Patient Wait Time

When it comes to sight, patients get very anxious, as it is the sense we most rely on. Longer waiting times can exacerbate a patient’s anxiety and make them frustrated, leading to an unsatisfactory visit to their practice. More importantly, it hinders patients from getting the care they need, especially those requiring emergency treatment.

Reducing patient wait times is perhaps the simplest way to improve patient experience. Additionally, it helps to improve another KPI, patient satisfaction, improving patient retention. An excellent strategy to reduce patient wait times would be to adopt a patient portal where an optometrist can gather information on their patients, in turn, reducing wait times before their appointment.

Patient Follow-up Rate

This performance metric deals with patient care after a prescribed treatment by the optometrist. These can include simple procedures like examining patients, prescribing glasses or medication, or complicated procedures like performing tests to diagnose rare eye diseases and post-surgical care.

An optometrist may have to perform multiple procedures if a prescribed treatment doesn’t work or if a disease progresses. By analyzing the cases with an increased follow-up rate, treatment becomes streamlined for similar cases, whereby the patient’s needs are met promptly.

From a business point of view, a patient is more likely to revisit if their needs are met proactively. Hence, using multiple communication channels such as emails, texts, and surveys may determine the best course of action for a patient’s ailments.

Missed Appointments

A patient can miss their appointment for many reasons such as financial troubles, transportation issues, or just plain old forgetfulness. However, they do not know the impact of their missed appointment. Other than a practice missing out on opportunity costs, resources can be diverted to taking care of patients in their stead.

The onus falls on an optometrist to check in with their patients before their appointments and confirm their availability. This can also be an excellent opportunity to gain valuable feedback from the patient to seek a reason for their missed appointment. It can point out deficiencies in your practice that may need improvement.

There are many more KPIs one can analyze in their optometry practice to make it grow even further, but the ones mentioned above are perhaps a good starting point that provides value to both patients and doctors.

4 Tips for Young ODs

Since the pandemic hit last year, the world is still trying to adapt to some major changes.

Professionalism is the art of conducting yourself in a manner that lets others know they’re in good hands. It’s a guarantor to the people you’re dealing with that they can trust you and rely on you. An individual who embraces a code of ethics, values time, and stays true to their word is generally considered a thorough professional. The case is no different when it comes to your optometry practice.

The importance of professionalism

According to a survey conducted by The College of Optometrists, it has come to light that the clearest definition of professionalism embraces a number of factors.

Among them, building and maintaining relationships with patients, as well as staying on good terms with colleagues, takes precedence. Furthermore, looking to other professionals for guidance and mentorship, while making valuable contributions through research adds value to the profession as a whole.

Also talked about was the fact that routinely analyzing one’s practice, and suggesting and implementing ways to improve can do wonders for patients.

Here are some ways that are sure to make you stand out:

Look and dress the part

It’s true what they say about first impressions.

While every profession requires individuals to maintain their appearance, you need to be even more mindful of personal hygiene when dealing with patients.

Stick to your personal code of ethics

A solid set of ethics can take you very far. If you’re an honest person outside the workplace, chances are, you bring the same values to the clinic.

On an even more serious level, ethics include compliance with state and federal laws, which are ultimately meant to protect you, your family, and your patients.

Stay calm under pressure

Maintaining your calm when everything is falling apart is what will set you apart as a true professional. Everyone has days that are especially taxing, but it doesn’t help to lash out at colleagues or start whining.

Instead, take a deep breath, temporarily detach yourself from the situation, and try to look at it objectively. The next time a similar situation arises, you’ll know what to do.

Find a mentor

Even if you’re the best in the business, there will be days when you find yourself stumped.

Mentors can be sources of great support in such cases, and can include anyone from past professors to people you’ve met at training workshops.

Now that you’ve got these handy pointers under your belt, you’re ready to take your personal brand of professionalism up a notch or two, especially in these trying times.

Implementing an Optometry Compensation Plan

Optometry compensation plans need to be executed carefully since they are highly controlled expenses for an optometry clinic. You need to do is the right way to ensure that you don’t end up costing the clinic too much money. Here is how you can implement a proper action plan that will make the entire process more efficient.

1. Determining the Right Market Pay Rate for Every Position

Each position at the clinic will require a different compensation amount. You will need to use a salary survey to establish bands for salaries. These bands are basic groupings of existing salary rates based on

the experience of the candidate or the employee. You will need to determine the amounts for senior, mid-career, and entry-level positions. This can help you make decisions about hiring and raises.

2. Creating Comprehensive Job Descriptions for Every Position

You should think carefully about the responsibilities and duties of every position. Having a detailed and proper job description that includes duties, required skills, educational levels, and working hours can help the candidates and employees understand their position in a better way. The description should also have a summary of expected employee behavior.

The more accurate you are, the more realistically the employees can approach the task. The optometrists should make sure that the employees do their tasks well, and the job description can help with that.

3. Explain the Entire Process to the Team

Making sure you are transparent is the most important thing. You should answer any questions and make sure the employees know everything they can about the job. You can also meet with every employee individually to make sure they have a clear understanding of the expectations and compensation plan. This process will pay off in the long run.

4. Ensuring Team Accountability

The performance standards and responsibilities need to be met, but don’t wait till the end of the year to update the employees on their standing. You should give regular and clear feedback throughout the year to ensure that they are able to improve their performance. Frequent evaluations and reviews will help them, and they will definitely appreciate it too.

5. Reviewing Team Performance, Revenue, and Potential Raises

Evaluate who are the top performers for the year and reward them before anyone else. Then, you should look at the employees who may not have met your expectations and consider other options. For example, you can look for new hires or provide a chance for them to develop further. Offering formal reviews for all the team members can help.

Optometry compensation plans may not always be easy to execute, but only if you don’t follow the right steps. It doesn’t have to be such a complicated procedure if you have an action plan in place.

How to Attract and Retain Your Ideal Patient on a Budget

Visiting an optometrist is a fairly common practice as they offer patients a solution for bad eyesight, eye disease and help with detection of general eye problems. Research suggests that around 39 percent of adults in the USA consult an optometrist or ophthalmologist once a year.

Marketing your optometry business involves a careful analysis of marketing strategies and organizing a well through-out marketing plan. Here is how you can attract and retain your ideal patient on a budget:

Identifying the Ideal Patient

To make your optometry practice more effective and cover all your costs, it is imperative that you use relevant marketing tactics to attract the ideal type of patients. With the right patients coming in, you will be able to:

· Earn a higher return on investment

· Understand patient needs better

· Market your services in a cost-effective manner

Being able to target the right client base through better marketing strategies will enable your clients to have a better understanding of what services to expect. Having a good idea of what your customers want will also help you add value to your products and services.

There are 2 simple steps to identify the ideal target market:

1. Marketing Segmentation

Analyze the primary characteristics of your ideal patient. Start with segmenting the market into categories such as demographics, psychographics, geography and behavior. Evaluate where your target market stands to move closer to achieving a holistic overview of your ideal patient.

2. Patient Persona

Once you are done segmenting the market, you are bound to have a good idea about your ideal patient. Ask yourself what kind of patients you enjoy working with the most. List down some common attributes based on name, health attitudes, income, occupation, interests, habits, age and method of payment.

Figuring out the ideal patient does not mean you should refuse to treat those who do not meet your criteria. The goal is to make your business more profitable by prioritizing quality over quantity.

Marketing Tactics to Attract and Retain Your Ideal Patient

Good marketing strategies for your optometry business do not have to be expensive; they just need to be efficient. You should aim to market your products and services in a way that they provide valuable information to your target audience while increasing brand loyalty.

You can easily minimize your budget once you figure out details regarding your ideal patient and optimize your marketing tactics accordingly. Both traditional marketing and online marketing strategies are likely to benefit your business as long as you ensure you pick and choose the right ones based on the clientele you wish to attract and retain.

Conventional Marketing

Although the internet is gaining popularity as a marketing platform, it has not yet eliminated the need for conventional marketing practices. Some vital ones include:

1. Referral program

A patient referring your business to other people is not only an efficient marketing strategy but is also a compliment as it assures you that you are doing your job well.

Start a referral program by offers such as a voucher, discount, gas card or lucky draw token. This is a good way to show your appreciation and promote your services.

2. Take out time for local charities

Strengthen your brand loyalty by joining charities. This will help build trust and establish the reliability of your optometry business.

When patients will notice your efforts to give back to the community, they will have a higher opinion of your business. Your passion to help others is likely to make your customers keep coming back to you.

3. Broadcast or outdoor ads

An eye-catching advertisement or an infectious jingle will not fail to get noticed. Radio is an effective and reasonable medium to tap the local market.

A well-designed billboard ad is also likely to be retained by people. Whenever they will feel the need to consult an optometrist, they may recall your advertisement.

Online Marketing

In this day and age, the scope of digital marketing is growing tremendously. Having a noticeable online presence allows you to attract a large customer base and is easy on the pocket.

1. Email Marketing

Keep sending emails to your clients from time to time to reinforce their preference for your products and services. Ask people for their email addresses when they register with your services.

You can email people about new offers, newsletters, and reminders for yearly check-ups. Moreover, you can also market in subtle ways by sending out informative emails regarding eye health.

1. Website

Focus on developing a website that is designed well and provides people with valuable information about your products and services. When people search for an optometrist’s services, they are bound to use a search engine rather than a traditional phonebook, which is why it is important to have a powerful online presence.

Make sure the visitors on your website enjoy a good user experience. In order to be visible to the right kind of users, your website must be optimized for search engines.

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is a process that ensures that the site is structured in a way to rank higher on the search engine results page. It involves tweaking your website to increase its loading speed, making it mobile-friendly and placing visible calls-to-action to convert visitors into customers.

2. Social Media Marketing The latest findings show that as many as 2.7 billion people are active on Facebook every month. The importance of maintaining your presence on social media cannot be overstated.

Make sure you are visible to your target audience on leading social networks such as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Routinely update your clientele about new offers and practices to keep them engaged.

Choose your marketing platforms wisely in order to attract and retain your ideal patient. Both conventional marketing and digital marketing avenues can be used in a cost-effective manner one you have a clear idea of your target audience and the way to reach them.

References:

1. Statista https://www.statista.com/statistics/917000/optometrist-ophthalmologist-visit-frequency-among-adults-us/

2. Statista https://www.statista.com/statistics/264810/number-of-monthly-active-facebook-users-worldwide/

Ways to Grow your Optometry Business with Uninsured Patients.

This optometry blueprint is designed to increase your customer base by attracting uninsured patients to your door. It also results in a stable, recurring profit growth that you can rely on even more than insurance payments. The optometry strategy is important for any clinic to grow and build a base of loyal patients.

Ways to Grow your Optometry Business with uninsured patients.

There are four common ways that optometry owners can grow.

1. Marketing Material throughout the Clinic

Every room in the clinic should have marketing material so that all patients know about the the different programs your office offers. They should be curious about the material so that the office staff can talk about the details about the program with them.

2. Staff Should Be On the Same Page

All the staff members should have clear knowledge about the program so that they can speak clearly to patients. By working as a team, you will remove the burden from your office manager and increase the likelihood of the patient to understand the program.

3. Talk With Insured Patients As Well

Speaking about the program with insured patients is also important. An optometrist clinic cannot just rely on insurance payments, which are often late. The patients may like the additional benefits they are getting from your program. Explain what their insurance covers and what your program can provide for them and the value.

4. Find Uninsured Patients

Your database should keep track of all uninsured patients that walk through the doors. By presenting the program to them through letters, emails, or calls, you can get more patients to sign up. Activate patients you have not seen in years. With the pandemic many are in between insurances.

Attracting Uninsured Patients

If you want the program to succeed, you will need to attract more uninsured patients towards the practice. There are many marketing tools that can come in handy in such cases.

Direct Mail

Direct mail can help you create awareness about the program. You can target certain communities and areas at once time. The post office has a service to be able to direct mail your target audience. Many times self employed people might have high deductible insurances and can be treated as self pay.

Online Advertising

Social media and other online advertising platforms are a great option for reaching many specific target audiences. You can segment possible audiences and send out targeted ads to educate them about your optometry program. Having patients understand what your office can offer compared to using insurance and paying more.

Community.

Connecting with retirees can be a great way to form an image of an optometrist that works for the community. Many times their insurance does not cover routine care. Your program might be a way to attract them.

Working with local HR departments to have wellness eye exams as part of your services in addition to their medical insurance is a great way to attract uninsurance patients. Develop a contract that is attractive to that company to provide care for their employees. These patients will tend to pay more than vision care plan patients and be more loyal to your practice.

Conclusion

The optometry program can be a wonderful way to offer benefits to uninsured patients. It can also help the clinic build better connections, a loyal patient base, and recurring, stable income. It can also be a great way to keep patients from looking for other options as they know what you have to offer instead of at the moment decision on which eye care professional to choose.

How to Build Your Leadership Skills: Difference between a Leader and a Manager.

If you want to become a leader in the workplace, you’ll need to change more than just your outlook. Becoming a true leader isn’t as simple as managing a team and delegating tasks. You need to learn how to handle stressful situations with ease and make sure that everyone in your team feels valued.

Instead of just supervising a group of people and getting the work done, you need to inspire them to do better every day and step out of their comfort zone. Your focus needs to be on building relationships with your employees and getting them to trust you.

Let’s take a look at what sets a leader apart from a manager and how to develop leadership skills in the workplace.

1. Be Open-Minded and Innovative

Leaders are always open to new things. They have a passion for creating, and they don’t shy away from experimenting with new ideas. They don’t believe in sticking with tradition and are always looking for better opportunities to explore.

They’re unafraid of the challenges that come their way and encourage their employees to think outside of the box. Managers, on the other hand, believe in sticking to what they know. They aren’t open to new changes and like to stay within their comfort zone.

2. Take Risks

Leaders are all about taking risks every time an opportunity presents itself. They understand the importance of risks and are eager to learn from their failures. They believe that risks bring forth a realm of possibilities for any business and help a company grow.

They aren’t scared of failing because they realize that every failure is a blessing in disguise. They exude an aura of positivity and create a sense of hope and curiosity in their employees.

Managers avoid taking risks because they don’t feel comfortable in newer and unforeseen territories. They believe in following tried and tested ways to solve all their problems and don’t appreciate disruptive thinking in the workplace.

3. Stand Out from the Rest

Leaders are driven by their need to stand out and be unique. They’re aware of themselves and aren’t scared of owning up to their shortcomings. They’re willing to take their business to new heights by deviating from established procedures.

They value different opinions and encourage their team members to share and explore new ideas.

Managers like to emulate their predecessors. They replicate what they’ve been taught and don’t feel comfortable with the idea of standing out. They aren’t always eager to accept responsibility for their mistakes. For them, their employees are just individuals who work for them and are expected to complete the tasks they’ve been assigned.

Bottom Line

Now that you’ve learned what makes a leader different from a manager, you can also become a great leader in the workplace by changing your way of thinking. The next time you’re faced with a challenge, you need to be willing to take risks and have an open mind to increase your chances of success.