Posts

What Good Leadership looks like in Corporate Optometry.

While being a leader comes naturally to some people, for others it’s not that easy. 71% of companies don’t feel like their leaders have the ability to help their organization reach new heights. So what are the traits that distinguish a manager from a leader who has the ability to influence the people around them and engage the ODs?

1. Be Passionate

You can’t fake your interest in your work. Global legends like Steve Jobs and Jeff Bezos didn’t amass corporate empires because they liked their work. In order to take your company’s name to the top, you have to be willing to stick with it through the tough times. Leaders are passionate about their jobs that they know different aspects of the business and are willing to continue to learn.

2. Communicate

People in leadership positions tend to talk more but not listen to their team enough. Communication is a two-way road. Listening to your team’s ideas, providing constructive feedback and allowing them to express their creativity is essential. Give the people around you the comfort that you’re always available to help. Good leaders in corporate optometry listen to their ODs. Decisions are based on best interest of the ODs and their patients.

3. Be Ready to Make Decisions

Leaders may display hesitation when making decisions, especially if there are risks involved. But that’s what makes a true leader: the ability to make a decision, no matter how high the stakes are. Corporate Optometry leaders should not be afraid to question the norm or do something different.

Indecisiveness leads to endless discussions and by the time your company implements that decision, your competition may already be ten steps ahead. This can affect Corporate OD subleases.

4. Empower Your ODs

Gone are the days when companies followed a hierarchal structure and employees not at the top followed orders blindly. It’s okay if your team occasionally colors outside the lines. Empowering your ODs will strengthen their sense of loyalty towards the company and help them perform above and beyond what is required of them. ODs should be empowered to explore their strengths and be able to openly discuss issues that need to be addressed.

5. Be Charismatic

Be the leader in corporate optometry that aspire ODs to grow and to become successful over their career. With your words alone you can move mountains and take your organization to the top of the ladder. After hearing you speak, your employees should be motivated to take initiative and think of ways to deliver more than just what will keep the company stable.

6. Be Competent

It’s not enough to know the basic skills of your job. Those technical skills need to be combined with the right people skills to make you an inspiring leader. Be the leader your organization will remember for a lifetime by understanding every aspect of the company. Know how to get the best out of every OD and make the cogs of your company run faster and rust-free. Understanding the optometric side of the business to help sublease and employed ODs is very important, being a leader many ODs look to that person in that role to mentor them and guide them to personal growth and career advancement.

7. Be Accountable

Being a corporate leader won’t always be smooth sailing. In fact, after having spent a few years in the industry, you’ve probably dealt with your fair share of disasters and failed concepts.

Rather than ignoring them, it’s important to learn from them and make sure they don’t happen again.

If you were the one in charge, don’t thwart responsibility. Take the failure head-on and be a role model for your team. Show them how well you handle the failure and how you use it to push even harder towards success. Blaming others and not following up with solutions didn’t make you a leader just because you have a title.

Being a leader doesn’t mean keeping an organization stable. Stability means stagnancy which will eventually make you obsolete. The aim is to constantly aim to reach new heights. Leaders in corporate optometry have the trust of the ODs.

How Being a Parent Makes You A Leader in Your Optometric Practice

Optometry entrepreneurs often take inspiration from various sources to enhance their skills of being a leader. This can be from different areas such as psychology, geography, history, literature, language, etc.

However, there is one major element that often tends to get overlooked as a valid source of inspiration: Parenthood.

Having to bring a new human being into the world, raising them, nurturing them, keeping them safe and sound, and at the same time transforming yourself as an adult and a human being comes with its own challenges and needs to take initiatives.

Pulling all-nighters because of a crying and irritated baby, toddler sick days, teaching to be empathetic while learning to be empathetic, and at the same time handling household and office demands can be overwhelming yet will also teach the most valuable lessons of life.

Having an optometry business is like having a child. You have to take that risk, and then nurture it into a full grown entity that the world recognizes, and deals with. This is why a lot of the optometrists have named being a parent as one of the best teachers of skills when it came to being a leader in the business.

Be farsighted

You will have to treat your business exactly like your child. It is not your responsibility and you will have to think of its future like you do with your child’s. The way you start thinking about what school your child would be at the age of 10 you will have to think where you see your business in 10 years. Have a plan for growth, a defensive strategy for the competition and exit strategy among the many things to consider.

Toddler communication

Communicating with a toddler who may be throwing a tantrum or being stubborn is one of the most important things a parent does. Parents who have dealt with their toddlers while they throw a fit and have negotiated with them to come to a deal which will keep peace at both sides has become a master at bargaining. A lot of parent optometrists have discovered that after having taken care of a toddler they are able to handle negotiations better and have learned patience. They are able to develop skills like active listening and communicating effectively.

You are not afraid of saying no anymore

Fresh optometrists might be a little afraid of saying “No” at first, so as not to come off as rude to the other person. This could also be so as not to risk losing good business as well. But as a parent, you become aware of what things are to be said yes to and what things are to be said no to. It takes some repetition of doing so but now that you have started to say no, it will become way easier for you. There will come a time when you can say no to an email or out loud to a stakeholder without another thought of hindrance. The parent optometrist can take on a lot but saying no to the little things can be open doors to more opportunities and have an authoritative  voice for your decisions.

5 Traits of a Great Regional Manager in Corporate Optometry

5 Traits of a Great Regional Manager in Corporate Optometry.