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How to Manage Entitled Employees

Entitled employees can be a pain for your office, mostly because they have this “we’re better than the
rest” attitude. Entitled employees can be from all stages of the career path. It’s one thing to be self-confident, but completely another to be entitled. These
employees expect to be treated much better than others, and that’s when the problem begins. It doesn’t matter if they work in a private practice, corporate practice or have completed a residency entitled employees need to be dealt with right away.


One thing to know about these entitled employees is their psychology works differently. Each must’ve
gone through something in their lives that triggered their superiority complex. Every employee’s reason
to be entitled varies according to the events in their lives.
Let’s go through what psychological entitlement is and how it can be dealt with.


What is Psychological Entitlement?
Psychological entitlement stems from an employee’s background and achievements. Some young ODs come out of

optometry school and feel like they can just walk into a practice and take over. The mindset that they are a Doctor

can provide that entailment factor. Many will have achieved great goals whether it be grades, residency or a family

member in the optical industry.

They start believing they’re better than everyone else and should be
treated differently, much better. Some things entitled employees ask for are more income right away, seeing less patients per hour, not working nights and weekends and making demands.


The mechanics behind psychological entitlement is rather complex yet simple. Anyone you meet exhibits
signs of entitlement would easily tell you how they’re raised. Yes, it has a lot to do with one’s brought
up. As stated earlier as well, the reasons behind entitlement vary. However, entitlement in the
workplace stirs a pot of politics, employee rivalry, and eventually, misconduct, which can become a pain
for the practice manager or owner.


Provide Constant Feedback

The first thing you need to realize as a manger is that you can’t change an entitled employee’s mindset. However, you can manage their behavior and even curb their entitlement.

You can do so by providing them constant feedback in a neutral manner that doesn’t set
them off. For example, you can call them and tell them about their good performance. Also, at the same
inform them about their shortcomings. This will balance your review, and you won’t come off as a bad.

Research states that employees tend to respond more rationally when they’re given a negative
review along with a positive one.

Monitor Their Behavior
Entitled employees need to be managed by checking their overall performance and their behavior
towards other employees. If an employee is entitled, chances are they’re going to flaunt their “I’m
better than you” attitude to others as well, and that’s not right.

All employees need to feel accepted,welcome, and most importantly, equal. If they feel that other employees are supposedly getting
preferential treatment, even if they’re not, it can negatively affect their productivity. Hence, as a
manager, you need to ensure such behavior is not enforced. It’s a big responsibility to manage all of
your employees and an even bigger responsibility to provide all employees with a sense of belonging.

Final Points
Entitlement is an issue that can make things worse for other people. When someone’s full of superiority
complex, they make others feel much less about them, and this doesn’t fare well for them. Hence, as a
manager, it’s up to you to ensure entitled employees keep such behaviors to themselves and not spread
them around the workplace. Entitled employees cause many issues in the practice, stop the issues before they get bigger!

Attracting Quality Talent in Optometry with Greater Transparency

Attracting quality talent entails optimizing your optometry practice in several ways. A focus on transparency and staff well-being will enable you to improve the profitability of your business in the long run.

Employees are more attracted towards practices that have a clear mission and adhere to their values. Here are 3 aspects that are of the utmost importance in hiring and retaining better talent.

1.      Develop good work culture

Work culture is an important part of an employee’s experience. Optometry practices usually focus on providing quality eye care, but their values and culture are hardly ever communicated.

Potential employees often research about a business before applying, making it a good idea to let them know what your practice values the most. For example, if teamwork is a key aspect for your practice, make that clear while you are hiring.

You can easily showcase the work culture of your optometry business on social media or within a job description. Doing so will help you attract employees who are more in line with your work objectives.

An important factor in attracting quality talent is building trust. It helps develop an open and transparent company culture to hire suitable people and retain suitable employees. Make sure you improve communication within your organization so that employees can easily connect with each other to share valuable information.

Prevent toxicity by openly discussing current challenges with employees and coming up with solutions as a team. Moreover, keep employees motivated by sharing and recognizing their achievements.

2.      Offer thorough training

No matter how experienced your employees are, it is crucial to provide them with training relevant to your optometry practice. Optometry is a specialized field where employees should have sufficient knowledge about different equipment and vision-related issues.

When your hire employees, make sure you offer on-the-job training to get them acclimatized to their new work environment. Provide systematic training for each job role in your organization. Untrained staff is likely to soon feel disinterested and demotivated.

You on-boarding program should ideally begin with an introduction of your practice’s basic mission, followed by specific training for staff members. You can introduce job shadowing and role-play exercises to get new recruits familiar with the ins and outs of your practice.  Also fine tune their people skills, so that they are able to deal with patients more effectively.

3.      Compensate suitably

Remuneration is one of the prime motivating factors for employees. Allocate a budget for staff compensation to help manage finances more effectively.

Recruiting and retaining quality employees requires providing employees with a satisfactory package. Compensation generally includes salaries, bonuses, commissions, and other benefits. Experienced workers and practitioners are aware of their value in the market and seek a salary that is worth their services.

Make sure you offer a suitable amount to potential employees in order to hire the best candidates for your optometry practice. Recruiting efficiently will lower hiring costs and spare time and money for other important tasks.

Attract quality talent towards your business by ensuring employee satisfaction. With a good work culture, proper training, and worthwhile compensation, you are sure to draw in and retain competent employees.

Increasing Practice Value and Revenue with Technology

Increasing Practice Value and Revenue with Technology

By: Jeremy Bono, Sr. Technology Product Marketing Manager – ABB Optical Group

Patient satisfaction no longer just pertains to whether or not the patient was satisfied with their exam. It is much more of an all-encompassing measurement that pertains to the entire patient experience. From booking the appointment to how they were greeted at the front desk and from the variety of frame choices to how they perceive the overall value for the money and time spent, all these things and more are critical pieces to the achieving the highest ratings from patients. Like it or not, patients are consumers. For many practices it is hard to make that connection. But for those who do, it opens a whole new viewpoint from which to manage their practice. The most successful practice owners operating with this mentality are leveraging technology to exceed patient expectations and maintain high levels of patient retention. The pleasant bi-product of implementing these systems is improved in-office efficiencies and increased revenue.

For the past 6 months, ABB has been conducting various surveys to gain valuable insight into the ECP’s thought processes. Consistently, topics of revenue and efficiencies rank at the top of the most pressing operational issues. Yet, the interest level of activating the very technologies that can ease these concerns rank at the bottom of the list. Lack of time, awareness, uncertainty, risk and cost are all very plausible reasons for the disparity between these thoughts, but they should prohibit the practice from at least considering these technologies. There are numerous solutions to help protect your patient base while appealing to their buying preference and addressing some problematic office workflows, but there is no need to over complicate things.

Simply start by asking – what does your patient base want and need from your practice, so you are their eye care provider for years to come? Is it varied communication? Ease to schedule an appointment or reorder their contact lenses? Maybe they want the option for a virtual visit, or maybe it’s as simple as helping them maximize their insurance benefits.

Did you know that an estimated 20% of your patients have unused benefits? The problem is that if they are not on your schedule the likelihood of them maximizing those benefits, which can amount to tens of thousands of incremental practice revenue each and every month, is extremely low. ABB Verify, powered by Affinity Analytics solves this issue by automatically pulling in-network benefits for all scheduled appointments through intuitive integrations with leading practice management systems. It then sends patient emails and texts, reminding them of services due and of insurance benefits that may be available to cover those services. This proactive, targeted communication drives more patients back into the office for exams or products to help keep your schedule filled. Doesn’t that sound like a value-added patient service?!

Fact of the matter is that proper use of technology can provide your patients what they need to hold your practice in higher regard than any other competitive option. And ultimately, that’s what you want, right? Additionally, this same technology can help bridge any gaps between profitability, process efficiency and patient satisfaction.

If you’re interested in learning how you can exceed your financial goals and patient expectations by making the most of unused benefits and cut the time it takes to pull authorizations in half, please contact us today to schedule a demo on ABB Verify. Your patients will thank you.

ABB Analyze, powered by Glimpse

April 19, 2021

Every practice’s data tells a story. Not just of where they’ve been, but where they’re going. That data can serve as the North Star, guiding the strategic direction of the practice. The planning that follows most often begins with evaluating previous performance, setting a goal, determining the activities in which to execute to achieve that goal, implementing those activities and adjusting along the way based on the results – rinse, repeat.

All the intricacies that make up the plan can be complex and of course, ever-changing. But those complications shouldn’t apply to the collecting, storing and organization of that data. That’s where ABB Analyze, powered by Glimpse comes in.

At ABB Analyze, our sole purpose is to help practices succeed by making business analytics simple. Created by private business owners looking to maximize their performance, ABB Analyze understands first-hand, the challenges of successfully managing a business.

The system is designed to be intuitive, customizable and readily available. We show you opportunities, areas of improvement and how you compare to your colleagues. Most importantly, we save practices time so you can focus on what should be your number one priority, your patients.

To get the most out of your practice, you need to get the most out of your data. ABB Analyze will provide a clearer pathway toward increasing revenues and practice success.

To learn more watch this 2 minute video

Now Available! ABB Analyze Lite – FREE Access to 9 Key Practice Metrics – Get Started Here!

Jeremy Bono – Sr. Technology Product Marketing Manager, ABB Optical Group

Turn More Callers into New Optometry Patients with Call Analytics

Call analytics has become an important component of marketing a practice. It allows you to understand consumer needs and wants in order to attract and retain clients.

Train your staff to receive calls efficiently in order to convert more callers into new optometry patients. Here is how your business can benefit from call analytics:

Collect Data

Call analytics can help you gather valuable information about your target audience. Phone logs are usually collected when patients make a phone call to your practice.

You can figure out the clients’ phone numbers, date and time of the call, call duration, the number of times particular clients have called, and even an audio recording of the entire call. Analyze the reasons why people call in order to better understand consumer demand.

Clients usually call to schedule an appointment or make changes to their appointment. On the other hand, people who are potential customers may call to survey the products and services you offer. Collect and organize data from calls to help with your marketing campaign.

Know Your Target Audience

Staff members who answer the calls should be trained to connect with patients and potential customers in a happy and upbeat manner. Use words unique to your practice to showcase the professional values of your business.

Ask the caller’s name in the beginning and keep using it throughout the conversation to keep them engaged. Work on the rapport by listening to the caller attentively and avoiding outside distractions.

Monitor the call and notice the words used by the customers. This can help you improve keyword search on your website. As a result, your marketing budget will be allocated in a way that maximizes profits. You can also use the phone numbers to send text messages advertizing your optometry practice.

Reduce the number of calls that are routed to voicemail. Make it easy for people to connect to a human staff member rather than an automated response system. If it is necessary to activate voicemail sometimes, make sure a representative gets back to them shortly. Engaging customers effectively will help you draw up an effective marketing plan.

Tracking and recording phone calls can help you determine the efficacy of your customer service. It will enable you to identify and rectify shortcomings in order to enhance customer satisfaction and conversion rates. Monitoring the sales team’s conversations with patients and prospective clients will also help you evaluate their interaction and work on areas that require improvement.

Optimize Your Marketing Campaign

According to studies, the conversion rate of calls is 10 to 15 times higher than web leads. Consider purchasing a call analytics software to get a clear idea of where your marketing campaign stands. They offer different levels of tracking, such as keyword level, campaign level, and multi-channel attribution tracking.

Detailed insight can help you determine which individual marketing are most beneficial for your optometry practice. Keyword tracking will allow you note which keywords are most used during conversations. This data has the potential to drastically improve your digital marketing campaigns, such as pay-per-click ads.

Information gathered through campaign level tracking helps identify which online and offline marketing campaigns are successful in drawing in the most customers. Multi-channel attribution tracking allows you to measure the entire journey of a client from the beginning to the end. It will enable you to figure out which online marketing channels result in offline phone call conversions.

Customer experience is of the utmost importance for an optometry practice. You need to be attentive to customer requirements and expectations in order to make your practice a success. A careful evaluation of call analytics helps turn more callers into new optometry patients.

4 Ways to differentiate yourself in Optometry

Optometry school may have equipped you with all the technical knowledge and expertise you need, but did you know that this alone does not a great optometrist make?

Read on as we take a look at some of the things they should be teaching you in optometry school, but don’t.

Listening to patients

This may seem like an obvious one, but you’d be surprised to know that some medical professionals don’t truly listen to what patients are trying to tell them.

Each patient is different. Rushing through appointments isn’t going to do anyone any good. As an optometrist, you owe it to patients to give them your time and respect.

After all, hearing out a patient is integral to determining what is troubling them, and coming through with the correct diagnosis.

A good place to start the conversation would be finding out what the patient in question does for a living. This can help you gather basic insights into the kind of lifestyle they lead, and reach a more informed place before treating them.

Managing inventory

The importance of this simply can not be stressed enough, especially considering current pandemic times.

You can be almost certain that the equipment you need, or the medicine you require is either in short supply, or is not going to be delivered on time.

It would thus be prudent to be proactive and take out the time to figure out all that you might be needing to ensure the smooth running of your practice.

Dealing with numbers

No matter what your profession, it would serve you well to follow these words of wisdom to a tee.

It’s important to understand that at the end of the day, you’re running a business. While it’s understandable that as an optometrist, you may want to focus on treating patients while hiring someone else to deal with the monetary side of things, you must set aside a bit of time poring over orders, receipts, and invoices.

No one’s asking you to do a deep-dive, but it will only benefit you and your practice if you’re aware of some basics: service rates by the hour, supply pricing, and how to avail the benefits of loyalty programs offered by various companies.

Managing staff

People management is not as simple as it’s deemed to be. It is, in fact, one of the more challenging aspects to running a practice.

Any practice that is running like a well-oiled machine is sure to have an efficient, meticulous team working behind the scenes.

Maintain employee motivation by empowering them, trusting them, and granting them due recognition for their efforts.

A good way to go about this is by first trying to gauge how good they are at making decisions. To do this, you don’t necessarily have to entrust them with a task; you can start by having routine discussions at the clinic to see where everyone stands.

The tactics mentioned above will help add value to your practice, and even guarantee long-term success.

The Potential of Artificial Intelligence in Optometry

Artificial intelligence is a branch of computer science that uses various techniques that aim to mirror human intelligence. One AI technique is machine learning, which relies on vast data sets to learn and predict results without human intervention.

Artificial intelligence has slowly made its way to optometry as well. It is unlikely that it will ever replace an optometrist but instead has the potential to ease their jobs. This doesn’t mean that robots will be running around in our healthcare facilities, but rather AI focuses on a large amount of patient data to give insight into diagnosis and treatment methods.

Let’s look at how it has the potential to change an optometrist’s practice.

Streamline management

Many software is coming to the market that provides autonomous management of tasks related to patients. Repetitive tasks like scheduling, billing, and follow-ups can be done on the fly and updated as new information is received. This improves organizational productivity for many optometry practices, making them more efficient, and leaves more focus on patient care.

Early detection

One of AI’s advantages is that it can process vast amounts of data more quickly as a computer is doing most of the legwork. This especially comes in handy when processing optical coherence tomography (OCT) images, retinal images and dry eye. It can look for patterns within these images that optometrists might miss because of the subjective nature by which these images are analyzed.

Diabetic retinopathy

Machine learning can monitor these images over time and see if any changes are occurring that lead to eye diseases that manifest progressively. FDA-approved AI systems are already appearing on the market that analyze fundus photography to detect elements of diabetic retinopathy such as hemorrhages, aneurysms, and other lesions. It can detect these changes early on, leading optometrists to formulate a health plan with the patient. Additionally, this system requires minimal training and can outperform humans.

Glaucoma

The technology is currently in its early stages to detect other ocular diseases such as glaucoma by fundus photographs, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and visual fields. It is beneficial for open-angle glaucoma cases where symptoms don’t typically exhibit themselves. Since glaucoma can’t be cured, early detection may help manage the disease to prevent it from getting worse to the point of blindness.

Dry Eye

New technology has emerged in the Dry eye arena. Advanced Opthalmic Systems.

When it comes to talking to patients about their dry eye disease, a picture is worth a thousand words. Conversations become easier when you can show a patient an image of their ocular surface. Suddenly it all clicks. (Pun intended) AOS is one company that takes it a step further with innovative technology. The platform automatically grades an image for Bulbar Redness, Injection and Lid Redness. In Staining mode the software counts punctate of a fluorescein image. It can also convert a fluorescein image into 2D and 3D which brings a real wow factor.

The images show patients proof of their condition and the analysis provides context. It’s much like the difference between stating a fact and telling a story. We can now give meaning to symptoms felt and seen in the eye. And it’s especially useful for assessing progress during follow up appointments. Lower redness numbers or lower punctate counts tell me and the patient we are on the right track. AOS analysis improves patient education which helps boost compliance. Better compliance leads to better outcomes and that leads to happy, loyal patients.

Reduce false positives

False positives occur when a test result shows that a disease is present when it is not in reality. Here AI can help as well. By looking at vast amounts of medical data regarding symptoms that a patient presents, it can predict the likelihood of a disease or condition is present.

This helps the patient from any unnecessary discomfort in terms of added consultations to their optometrist or an ophthalmologist, saves their time, and saves money on any unnecessary medication they may require.

Artificial intelligence is showing its potential in many medical fields other than optometry, like oncology, dermatology, pharmacology, and genetics. Though still in its infancy, improvements in this technology will help doctors verify their diagnoses and interpret data faster independently. This does not mean that a doctor’s work will become redundant, as AI algorithms are not yet 100% accurate. There will cases when a doctor’s insight will be invaluable in diagnosing diseases. It can be considered a tool to their advantage.

3 Important KPIs to Improve Your Optometry Practice

If you run an optometry practice, you have to worry about your patients’ eye health and, on top of that, manage resources, improve productivity, and ensure profitability. Key performance indicators (KPIs) are essential factors to consider when analyzing your practice.

By monitoring KPIs, one can assess where their practice is lacking, what needs to be improved, and what redundancies need to be addressed. This leads towards a more growth-oriented optometry practice and ensures a patient-centric model of operation.

Patient Wait Time

When it comes to sight, patients get very anxious, as it is the sense we most rely on. Longer waiting times can exacerbate a patient’s anxiety and make them frustrated, leading to an unsatisfactory visit to their practice. More importantly, it hinders patients from getting the care they need, especially those requiring emergency treatment.

Reducing patient wait times is perhaps the simplest way to improve patient experience. Additionally, it helps to improve another KPI, patient satisfaction, improving patient retention. An excellent strategy to reduce patient wait times would be to adopt a patient portal where an optometrist can gather information on their patients, in turn, reducing wait times before their appointment.

Patient Follow-up Rate

This performance metric deals with patient care after a prescribed treatment by the optometrist. These can include simple procedures like examining patients, prescribing glasses or medication, or complicated procedures like performing tests to diagnose rare eye diseases and post-surgical care.

An optometrist may have to perform multiple procedures if a prescribed treatment doesn’t work or if a disease progresses. By analyzing the cases with an increased follow-up rate, treatment becomes streamlined for similar cases, whereby the patient’s needs are met promptly.

From a business point of view, a patient is more likely to revisit if their needs are met proactively. Hence, using multiple communication channels such as emails, texts, and surveys may determine the best course of action for a patient’s ailments.

Missed Appointments

A patient can miss their appointment for many reasons such as financial troubles, transportation issues, or just plain old forgetfulness. However, they do not know the impact of their missed appointment. Other than a practice missing out on opportunity costs, resources can be diverted to taking care of patients in their stead.

The onus falls on an optometrist to check in with their patients before their appointments and confirm their availability. This can also be an excellent opportunity to gain valuable feedback from the patient to seek a reason for their missed appointment. It can point out deficiencies in your practice that may need improvement.

There are many more KPIs one can analyze in their optometry practice to make it grow even further, but the ones mentioned above are perhaps a good starting point that provides value to both patients and doctors.

4 Tips for Young ODs

Since the pandemic hit last year, the world is still trying to adapt to some major changes.

Professionalism is the art of conducting yourself in a manner that lets others know they’re in good hands. It’s a guarantor to the people you’re dealing with that they can trust you and rely on you. An individual who embraces a code of ethics, values time, and stays true to their word is generally considered a thorough professional. The case is no different when it comes to your optometry practice.

The importance of professionalism

According to a survey conducted by The College of Optometrists, it has come to light that the clearest definition of professionalism embraces a number of factors.

Among them, building and maintaining relationships with patients, as well as staying on good terms with colleagues, takes precedence. Furthermore, looking to other professionals for guidance and mentorship, while making valuable contributions through research adds value to the profession as a whole.

Also talked about was the fact that routinely analyzing one’s practice, and suggesting and implementing ways to improve can do wonders for patients.

Here are some ways that are sure to make you stand out:

Look and dress the part

It’s true what they say about first impressions.

While every profession requires individuals to maintain their appearance, you need to be even more mindful of personal hygiene when dealing with patients.

Stick to your personal code of ethics

A solid set of ethics can take you very far. If you’re an honest person outside the workplace, chances are, you bring the same values to the clinic.

On an even more serious level, ethics include compliance with state and federal laws, which are ultimately meant to protect you, your family, and your patients.

Stay calm under pressure

Maintaining your calm when everything is falling apart is what will set you apart as a true professional. Everyone has days that are especially taxing, but it doesn’t help to lash out at colleagues or start whining.

Instead, take a deep breath, temporarily detach yourself from the situation, and try to look at it objectively. The next time a similar situation arises, you’ll know what to do.

Find a mentor

Even if you’re the best in the business, there will be days when you find yourself stumped.

Mentors can be sources of great support in such cases, and can include anyone from past professors to people you’ve met at training workshops.

Now that you’ve got these handy pointers under your belt, you’re ready to take your personal brand of professionalism up a notch or two, especially in these trying times.

Creating an Inviting Eye Clinic Reception

Eye clinics may not always invoke positive feelings among patients. People rarely look forward to eye tests, especially people who are squeamish about someone getting close to their eyes. While this may seem like dramatization, it can be more prudent to do something actionable.

By creating an inviting eye clinic reception, you can appease apprehensive patients. Creating a good atmosphere to welcome patients with can make a great first impression on them. The first impression will dictate how they feel about the rest of the experience too.

Here are some ways to create an inviting eye clinic reception.

A Welcoming Environment

Generally, eye clinics rarely radiate warmth. Clinical and cold colors are often used, which can lead to a lack of warmth. By adding more color to the reception area with soft furnishings, you will experience

more friendliness and warmth in the reception. You can even have some gentle music playing in the ground. You can even add some games or toys for kids and magazines for adults. If you think no one actually reads newspapers anymore, you can simply provide free Wi-Fi so folks can use their phones in peace while they wait. It can set patients at ease.

Welcoming and Warm Staff

A lot of patients may be on edge, so they don’t really need the extra bonus of a non-empathic staff. Some kind words and welcoming staff at the reception can be crucial for setting the patients at ease. It can also create long-term, loyal patients if they feel welcome in your clinic.

Make sure the person who manages the phone is also warm and kind. An abrupt or cold approach can lead to the patient not even attempting to enter the clinic in the first place.

Flexible Payment Mediums

You need to understand that healthcare is definitely expensive for a lot of people. If you provide patients with plenty of options to make payments, such as mentorship programs, it can make them feel much better about visiting your clinic. Considering their needs means to be upfront about costs and have transparency in the billing portion too.

Effective Scheduling and Appointment System

One of the biggest mistakes is to make patients wait around even after they are on time for their appointment. In rare cases, it can be quite inevitable, but you should still keep a strict check on time. An inviting eye clinic reception is one that operates on time so that no patient gets frustrated. You can automate the scheduling system to send patients text alerts for any schedule changes or delays too. The staff should also be trained properly in handling patient timings.

Creating an inviting eye clinic reception is more than just doing the bare minimum of adding furniture. You have to consider the needs of the patient and design your work culture and clinic accordingly.