Practice Gratitude in Optometry

We might all be yearning to have a dream home that has come right out of a scene of Keeping Up with the Kardashians. Your optometry career is not keeping up with “Larger practices” We always want those nice cars and successful practices. We all dream about been sprawled on our own private beach under the sun having a margarita. However, not all of us get to live in such a manner. We might feel that as healthcare providers we should have everything, but it doesn’t necessarily make you happy. We can blame managed care plans, online retailers and big corporations for our short comings but it is up to you to see the great profession that optometry is. One way is to start with gratitude. It can change your perspective on optometry’s future overall.

The generation before us, our parents, would often just compare themselves with their neighbors because they didn’t have access to the internet and there was no concept of reality TV. However, we have been conditioned by reality TVs and movies that showcase the most extravagant mansions that the celebrities own. Social media also plays its part, where you can constantly see pictures of millionaires and their kids having the time of their lives. We can’t compare our optometric practices to the practices of the 70s. We have many obstacles, but we must see the horizon of optometry. We have changed our scope of practice, technology has advanced and has enhanced our quality of patient care. Some many great things have changed optometry and will continue to evolve. We need to see the positives  instead of the obstacles.

Whatever we have is not just based on our hardwork, but also luck has some sort of part in it. The type of people you meet, being in the right place at the right time, etc. all of this is true and it is all of this that will get you to the place where we all dream of going. At the moment we hate cooking for ourselves (if only there was a gourmet chef who would cook us spectacular meals everyday), we all hate doing our laundry (if only there was someone who would take our clothes to the laundromat and we could afford to get our clothes washed by them every few weeks), we hate traveling economy class (if only we had our private jet that served champagne and steak). We might not like the way things have changed our profession over the years but it is up to us to take our profession back!

“We are not responsible for what our eyes are seeing. We are responsible for how we perceive what we are seeing.” ~Gabrielle Bernstein

 

But we don’t need to get caught up in all the glamour and impossibly try to align ourselves with those standards. We need to learn to align our resources with the things that matter the most to us:

* Follow the example of the minimalist movement. This movement is primarily concerned with prioritizing your time and money around the things that you put most value in.

* Another important thing that you need to surround yourself with colleagues that will elevate you.

* Strike a balance between living in the now and the what if of the future.

* Be happy with what you have. We can be so easily sucked into the materialism of the world and forget that what we already have is enough. We always want the biggest and the better. We need to be thankful for what we already have.

  • Practicing gratitude will create a positive mindset. It is contagious! It will increase your satisfaction of optometry and will reflect on your patient care.  Practicing gratitude will help minimize burn out because you will be happy with what you are doing.
  • Some ways to start are keeping a journal of all the positives in your office or talking a walk during your lunch break to think about all the positive things you have accomplished even the smallest wins!
  • It will give you the positive energy to set your proprieties straight. Soon you will notice your strengths and contribution to others and creating engagement in your practice!
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