How Bad Regional Managers Drive ODs Away from Corporate Optometry

There are many modes of practices available to optometrists. Corporate Optometry has become more popular than ever to many ODs, they usually start their career by working in a commercial establishment. Many times regional managers can make or break a decision for an OD.

Working in corporate optometry has its own perks. Optometrists receive steady paychecks and they can make more money with annual raises. Some ODs are simply not interested in running a business.

Here’s how bad regional managers drive ODs away from corporate optometry

They Create Politics

Vindictive managers threaten the job security of their employed ODs. A leader should be the one to set a good example. Instead, they misuse their power and authority to put down the optometrists and to show them who the boss is.

They Give Unfair Criticism

Bad managers don’t understand the difference between constructive and unfair criticism. They can create unfair working environments. If one OD is able to do something than it should be good for another OD in that region. start insulting their employees instead of teaching them. If an OD is able to leave early and another is not then an OD can start feeling pressurized and unappreciated.

They Bully and Abuse

Regional managers, who are bullies, use abusive tactics to communicate with the optometrists. Ignoring issues and emails, and using the silent treatment can be viewed as a bully behavior. If you are being ignored than contact your Professional Relations department.

They Have an Ego Problem

If a corporate optometry has leaders who are know-it-alls, then it’s a huge problem for the employees. Egoistical managers will put all the blame on the employee when things go wrong and will take all the credit when they go right. Nobody likes someone who thinks that they are not capable of making mistakes.

They Silence Their ODs

Silencing the voice of employees is unethical and can make them feel unappreciated. A good leader listens to what the people have to say. If the employees feel that they can only talk about something when it’s safe to talk about it then it’s a sign that they have dominant leaders. Those leaders think of themselves as unquestionably right.

They Lie or Do not give credit

Manipulative bosses lie to their ODs in order to move their own agenda forward. Sometimes ODs are blamed for the business going down, other times when an OD is doing something to help the business, they do not get the credit they deserve. Make sure that your work is being acknowledged and also is know by corporate headquarters.

They Start Micro-Managing

Being a team leader doesn’t mean that one has to take control of everything. Finicky managers want to monitor and personally control each and every movement of their team members. No optometrist would like to be micro managed.

Managers play a vital role in the success of a business. Companies lose good employees just because of poor management. Regional managers tend to focus on the dollars flowing in the door and forget that ODs are the most essential part of their business.

Routine vs Medical

Whether you have been practicing optometry for quite some time now or are about to enter the field soon, you would know how important it is to satisfy patients in terms of eye care and the overall service you provide.

And a major difficulty faced by ODs and optometrists worldwide is when their patients can’t understand why their visit is being billed when they have insurance or when their examination is called ‘routine’ and when it is ‘medical.’

Apart from customer satisfaction, what lies between your optometry practice being profitable and incurring revenue losses is to know when an examination is routine or medical and therefore, bill it accordingly.

While customers are normally confused between the two types of exams, a part of the confusion stems from doctors themselves.

When the ODs and the staff are clear and confident about the services they provide only then can they can satisfy their patients better.

What is a routine exam?

A patient’s exam will be considered routine if there is no emergency or chief compliant behind their reason to visit. If they don’t have a history of any major eye illness or disease, the diagnosis involves low to no decision making or the primary diagnosis is refractive in nature, then the examination will be considered routine.

What is a medical exam?

Unlike a routine exam, a medical exam requires some important decision-making. There is usually a chief complaint or some other ailment that compels the patient to visit an optometrist.

If the medical diagnosis correlates with their complaint or even if there is no apparent reason but the patient has a history of some ocular disease then their examination will be marked as a medical exam.

It goes without saying that everyone wants to save money. Therefore, most patients want to use their routine benefits in order to save what they can. But being an experienced practitioner, if you deem the exam to be medical then it is necessary to explain to the patient why you will be billing their medical insurance.

You need to handle such situations well because it shows to customers that you provide a higher level of eye care than they might have imagined.

It is best you sort things out as early as when a patient calls or visits to book an appointment.

Ask them if they have any medical condition such as diabetes, hypertension.

Diabetes is amongst the leading causes of blindness, so in case a patient is diabetic, let them know that their exam will be considered medical.

Also, ask the patients about their insurance details so that you can decide whether they are eligible for bill reductions or not.

Suggest if they require an OCT scan or a retinal photo and confirm their eligibility for different eye-health benefits.

Give your patients an intake form that explains when an examination is routine and medical.

Ask them to carefully read it and then sign and submit it to you before the exam.

This shows that they acknowledge their understanding of routine and health insurance benefits and how these benefits can be utilized.

Is Your Head in the Clouds? Well Your Practice Should be in “The Cloud”!

Is Your Head in the Clouds? Well Your Practice Should be in “The Cloud”!

 

How cloud-based EHR & automated practice management will transform your office, save you time, and money.

 

By Adam Stelzer, O.D.

 

If you want to become a better optometrist, you should be using an EHR/practice management system in an effort to streamline your practice and optimize patient care. However, the key is getting the right system because you may risk setting yourself up for extra work, lost data, and even compromising patient information.

 

For years, optometrists have dealt with these frustrations. That’s why it is important to find an EHR/practice management system that is built by developers who understand the direct needs of their fellow colleagues. For optometry, there are solutions available that were built by optometrists, specifically for optometry. These solutions are better formatted for the flow of an eye exam, with short cuts to simplify common norms and medical reference databases, as well as auto-fills to quickly complete common procedures, impressions, and plans. There are even systems that integrate with labs, so you can order contact trials during an exam with the click of one button. You can trust that optometrists have a first-hand understanding about what tools would help streamline an eye exam and allow attention to be given to the patient, rather than data entry.

 

With such rapid advances in technology, we can all see that “the cloud” is extremely useful today and will be indispensable in the future. Soon enough, we’ll find that it will be utilized in every facet of life for securely warehousing all of our data.

 

A major benefit to a cloud-based system is that you greatly reduce the security risk that a local server system inherently has; where information can be stolen, damaged, or corrupted by it’s need for physical storage space. With a high quality cloud-based EHR/practice management system, your information is encrypted, so it cannot be stolen or compromised. It is virtually backed up, so the risk of losing data is greatly reduced. It is also accessible instantaneously from any location in the world. This allows the doctor to complete charts or access reports at any time. Your system needs to be fully secured and HIPPA-compliant.

 

The cloud doesn’t limit you to a room in your office, where you likely have limited storage capacity. Even if you previously saw a patient and charted their exam on paper, you should be able to scan and upload those charts into a cloud-based system. In a system with unlimited storage capacity they’ll be stored within that patient’s profile indefinitely. All of your past and current patients’ records are available to you conveniently within one system, even if they are at a different office location within your practice group. This eliminates the need for paper, boxes, storage, and makes it so much quicker to access.

 

Patients are now looking for health care providers that give them easier access to scheduling appointments online, getting appointment reminders via text messaging, the ability to complete paperwork in advance (eliminating time in the waiting area), as well as the ability to access their data online, and at any time. A modern system can offer a unique link to an online scheduling feature, with the ability to customize available appointment time slots and intervals between appointments, and integrate directly into your office schedule. Some cloud-based EHR/practice management systems can give patients access to a private portal where they can fill out their paperwork and medical history, which can significantly reduce patient check-in times. The patient can even access their prescriptions, invoices, and referrals after their appointment through their portal. This feature gives you and your staff back invaluable time to focus on more important things, such as patient care.

 

One of the biggest cost and time savings is from an integrated patient text messaging feature. You should look for a system that is fully comprehensive, so you can eliminate the high-cost third-party SMS services. With that feature included, it’s as if you’re hiring another staff member to do all of your patient recalls, but at no additional cost. You’ll want to find a system that gives you unlimited text messaging and two-way patient communication that can be done right from within the system. A great system will allow you to maintain and keep unique communication contacts and securely e-Fax them from within the system. This allows you to easily manage your patient information sharing; with pharmacies via e-Prescribing, other health-care professionals via patient referrals, with labs for optical material orders, and with third-party payers and clearinghouses for billing. Communication should be simple and automatically recorded under the patient’s profile.

 

Another major benefit to an EHR/practice management system is the ability to track analytics and generate reports. It is important to consider the analytics feature of a system not just as an “extra”, but as a powerful and necessary tool to help you track the statistics about your practice. These reports can show you the growth of your practice, in number of patients and sales volume, and even help target specific markets, products, or clients. You can also use the reporting to correct mismanagement and check the performance of staff, or even certain inventory items and products. It’s important to get daily summary reports, and a good system will allow you to create customized reports when you want them.

 

If you are not using a cloud-based EMR/practice management system, you need to reconsider your reasoning for not jumping on board. There are systems that are robust, completely customizable, and inclusive of all of the aforementioned must-haves, for as low as $99 per month. Explore your options, and be sure to recognize when a system is over-priced. Many times, you’re just paying for the markup and hidden fees of outdated systems, where those unnecessary costs are pushed onto you, the practice owner. There are great systems that offer new state-of–the-art platform designs with no contracts, no sign-up fees, no charges for updates. A select few will even give you and your staff training, as well as directly assist you in getting your data transferred from another system, at no additional charge. Take the few minutes to do a free demonstration to see how a system can fit your needs. With the right EHR/practice management solution, you can trust that you’ll find yourself less stressed with a more streamlined and efficient optometry practice – at least, it did for me!

 
$0 Activation Fee
No Contracts
 
Designed by ODs for ODs
Plans starting at $99/M!
 
Let us help you streamline your practice, save time, and increase profits. Sign up now for your free and personalized demo and see why it’s easy to make the switch to the most comprehensive and cost-effective EHR in the market!
 
Schedule a free 20 minute live demo! Mention you were referred by 
 
1.800.257.7105

 

 

How to Reduce Eyewear Remakes

Whichever angle you look at it from, eyewear remakes are always costly.

They take additional time and resources because the order is placed again, which means that both, the clinic staff and lab technicians need to work all over for the second time.

Not only does this mean unsatisfied customers, which can ruin your reputation as a good optometrist, but can also lead to business losses as the eyewear is remade and re-shipped for the optical.

Although there can be various reasons why a customer asks for a remake, a prescription change recommended by a doctor is seldom one of them. It’s either that the customer finds their new glasses difficult to adjust to or it’s not to their liking and hence, they demand it to be changed.

While you are likely to keep a margin in your business and allow a free remake once per customer, don’t you wish the need doesn’t arise in the first place?

If you are looking for ways to reduce eyewear remakes, here are a few tips to help you make sure that your customers are satisfied when they try on their new glasses.

Have a clear conversation

If you want to master the art of refraction, start by listening to your patients very attentively.

Have a thorough conversation to see what type of glasses your customer wants. If they ask you for suggestions or leave the decision of design up to you, let them know what you think will suit them best and give them a sample to try on.

Give them time to make up their mind and make sure they are pleased before finalizing the order.

While most customers are usually very specific about what they want, listen attentively to determine whether they will be able to tolerate any changes in fabrication or not. Inform them beforehand if there’s a design or lens that may slightly differ from the one on display or shown in the catalog.

If there are customers with a past history of lens dissatisfaction, ask them to describe their ‘ideal’ eyeglasses. Discuss what issues they have faced before and how you can improve them.

Educate staff to troubleshoot

Your optical staff should be well trained to handle an unhappy customer.

Even if it gets a bit frustrating, the staff must maintain a friendly demeanor as they try to figure out what the issue is and how to fix it.

They should check if it’s a problem they can solve by themselves instead of simply sending the eyewear back to the lab.

Does the frame need a slight readjustment to ensure the customer is looking through the right part of the lens? Is there a pantoscopic tilt? Do the glasses lie flat on a surface or is the frame bent? Is it the way the patient is wearing the glasses?

Such minor issues can be easily fixed by the staff so make sure they are well trained to do that.

Moreover, if the customer demands a remake only because they feel that they are unable to adjust to their new eyewear, politely ask them to try the glasses for at least a week despite the initial discomfort.

Adjusting to a new pair of glasses takes time and they might not find the need for a remake once they wear it for a few days.

Characteristics of an Excellent Regional Manager in Corporate Optometry

Characteristics of Excellent Regional Managers in Corporate Optometry

Trust

They respect what ODs do and encourage ODs to practice the way they choose to. Don’t interfere with OD business. They understand that in order the optical to grow the OD side of the business needs to grow as well.

Work-Life Balance

They promote work life balance. They know that people work better and collaborate more if there is a balance. Burn out in corporate optometry is real.  Promoting a work life balance can help off set the burn out. Happy ODs can focus on growing a business and will result in increase in optical revenue.

Alignment

Keep optical staff focused on long term goals that includes growing the Doctor side of the business. Great regional managers understand the the patient experience is not an optical sale. Working with the Doctor side of the business will promote eye health and an image to the patient to continue to see the OD at that location. In the long term the patient that continues their care with that OD is more likely to continue to purchase from that optical. It can hedge from online retailers.

Support

Recognize and reward the optical staff and OD. Without the team goals can’t be achieved.

They encourage growth and want to see the OD business succeed. In the long term it will benefit the optical.

They won’t sacrifice the Doctor’s business to grow their own. Regional managers will not influence ODs office to offer quick services or cheapest eye exam in the area. They recognize this tactic will not grow the business in the long run.

Create a Culture of Accountability

They understand each location has unique strengths and weaknesses and use those intuition to create a strategic plan.

Provide resources to improve optical performance and find solutions. They do not blame.

When something goes wrong great regional managers work with the optical team and OD. They are accountable for their own results.

 

Exit Strategies for Your Business

Entrepreneurs of several businesses are often merely focused on the entrance and growth strategy. They keep coming with plans for what their product would be, what their marketing would be like, and how will they keep growing the business further for a better return. However, it is not just enough to build a business that is continuously bringing in income; you also have to look at the exit strategy that will be put in motion to get your retirement.

Take it all

One of the strategies that the progressive owners use is to take out all of the money from the business on almost a daily basis. This means that they will allow themselves a large salary, then reward themselves with a huge bonus and if they issue out shares, they also certify themselves to achieve a dividend that is significantly higher than the other shareholders. A lot of the entrepreneurs like to re-invest the profits that their business garners. However, you can try to keep the business small and rather take out a chunk of the profits and keep it for yourself.

However, when you do this, do remember that the money that is supposed to go in your wallet should not be in such a significant amount that it becomes nearly impossible for your business to survive or that you investors start becoming enraged.

Pros

You get to take home a colossal salary which may even allow you to afford the luxury of your choosing. When you take out the money from your business, assuming that your business has been gaining a handsome profit, you get to take home as much money as you want and it can be a lot.

There is no specific processor documentation that has to go into pulling out the money which would take way too much time.

Cons

The way you take out the money could result in negative tax accounts. There can be tax penalties and you might get a higher percentage of tax deductions on the money that you pull out, leaving you with significantly less money than you intended to have.

Also, if you are not too careful you might end up taking out more money than you need to. This means that if you take out way more than your fair share you will leave significantly less money for your business to fall back on in the future. Even though you might not want to grow your business far too much, it will still be useful to have some money to a certain level of growth. You need to keep adding some money, even if small amounts to the business. It can be for renovation of the business, switch to a new place, give appraisals to employees, promotion of the employees, etc. For all of this you will need a steady supply of money coming into your business. Other than that, it is always helpful to have some money in the savings for the business. You may need emergency cash at any time.

Liquidation

The simplest, and the least taken, exit strategy is to simply call it quits. Just strip the business of the money, divide it between yourself and the investors, and then shut it all down. Liquidation means bringing the business to a finish and then distributing the money left and assets to the claimants. This is supposed to happen when the business can no longer operate properly but it has its creditors to whom it owes money. This is one of the best exit strategies since the business will not be left with any sort of debt that the owner may later be pursued for.

Pros

It is an easy and natural thing to do. The owner does not have to overstress themselves with a new rejuvenating strategy. They will not be troubled by the shareholders and creditors.

You will not have to worry about to transfer the control too and whether the person you choose will be able to save the company from dissolving or not. A lot of arguments can erupt from this sort of a process. If you plan on transferring the power to someone close to you, the directors or other top management folks of the business can put forth vehement objection of the move and things could get far worse than they actually are at the current moment.

You don’t have to deal with any sort of longstanding and painstaking negotiations of any sort.when you try to take loans you have to negotiate with the bank, when you decide to merge you have to take the opinions of your top management, when you wish to transfer ownership you have to negotiate with your directors and shareholders, everything but total and immediate dissolving takes a lot of mediation that can turn unpleasant really quick.

Cons

The problem with liquidation is that you will never get the market value of your company’s assets. Due to a majority of your assets going into paying off your creditors and shareholders from the sales of your

assets, you will be left with significantly less money, which will not allow you to benefit from the full price of the asset.

When you liquidate your business, you might be relieved that you do not have to go through a debilitating process of arbitration; however, you need to be aware that this will have a massive effect on your reputation as an owner, a leader, and business. This may be very consequential when you try to come with a new business. It will be much more difficult for you to gain your pool of stakeholders and shareholders.

This might leave a lasting impression on your current shareholders. They might think that you are a “quitter” and may lose confidence in you for the sake of your other business ventures. You might find it incredibly difficult to gain those shareholders back if you ever have any other opportunity. They might even spread the word about the town of your working methods and your backing out of the entire business. This will actually exacerbate the second point that had been made previously. The more your shareholders spread the news of your quitting the business the more difficult it will become to gain investors. The situation can get even worse if the owner does not check with the shareholders and the board of directors.

Selling it off

When you have a business and a vision, you will not be the only who possesses that vision there will be your board of directors, shareholders, managers who will be following in your passion and have the same vision as you do. They will definitely be happy to buy off the company from you if they have enough resources to do so. This may also include your customers, children, friends, or other family members. The reason it would be better to sell it off to someone who has been working in the business is that they know the business runs, what are its requirements, and what are its weaknesses. This will help the business in not having to start from square one and it can take off from where it had been present previously.

When you leave the business in the care of your family you will have to make sure to see whether your family is functional. Leaving the business amongst several children can prove disastrous as all of them might fight for a share of the business. This will lead the business to a slow decline without really experiencing any sort of growth. If you decide on that route then you will have to carefully plan the entire thing so as to avoid any tussle between the family members.

Pros

You will not have to go through a tedious and lengthy process of searching for the right person and then trial testing them to see if they are the right fit for the business. This takes way too much time and resources all of which are bad for the growth of the business. With a person of whom you know, you will know how the person is and what they are capable of, whether they are in it for the money or do they genuinely wish to see their business thrive. You will be familiar with their work ethic which will help define your search even better.

The person who has taken over the business from you is highly likely to be someone who believes in the same cause as you. This means that they will keep intact the main vision and mission of the business even if they make certain changes upon their appointment. When a business has been functioning for quite a long time they tend to develop a certain brand image that the customer becomes aware of and loyal to. If the vision of the business changes it can have an impact on the brand image or the new owner may try to change the overall brand image. Either way, it has a serious effect on the customer base of the business. They may end up losing them and will have to reevaluate their new customer base again and devise what sort of marketing campaigns and product variations to target them.

If a manager or director from your previous team steps into the role of being the entrepreneur they will work with the benefit of the company in mind since that is what brought them into the project in the first place.

Cons

You might be a bit too generous when you find out that a person from your circle is taking over the business that you might leave way too much money on the table. This will leave far less with you and far too much with them.

Your friend or family member might discover that you left far too much to be paid in taxes and they might get riddles in that issue which will cause them to dedicate far less time to the business though it would need ample of time, since it was already in a decline, and a new authority would mean significant changes. This could lead to strain in your friendship with them.

Leaving the business to one child or family member can bring about a lot of animosity amongst the members and they will be spending the rest of their lives brewing in jealousy. This would also lead to poor decisions being made on behalf of the business which will lead the business to a further decline.

Acquisition

This is when the owner of the business sells the firm to someone else in the same industry. The best thing about this is that the business has a high chance of thriving since the company of the same industry is taking over. The owner of the acquiring company will know full well what to do to grow the new business.

Pros

If you find a good acquirer then they may a lot more than what your business is actually worth. This will depend on: who the acquirer is, how much your business is producing, what the resources within it are worth, etc.

This can work in your favor on an even greater level when there is a bidding war between different companies about who will get to acquire your business. This way you can drive up the sales price as much as you want.

Are You Experiencing Burnout in Corporate Optometry?

Burnout can happen at any point in one’s career. New graduates may adapt the mindset that they have to go above and beyond to show that they are willing to work hard and have talent. You may want to take on 40-hour weekdays, get to work early but stay at work late, and take on extra tasks or projects. While it’s tempting to do all of this to make a name for yourself and pay off your student loans, you need to be careful.
New graduates aren’t the only one’s taking on too much. Established doctors might be tackling new locations, handling new administrative tasks, and working strenuous hours to make up income. However, all these mindsets and actions can lead to burnout which affects your physical, mental, and social health, and your work ethic. Yet, some of us may not know when we are stretching ourselves too thin. Here are some signs:

Signs of Burnout

Physical Health. This is one of the most common signs that you are experiencing burnout and can be exhibited in many ways. In the morning you simply don’t want to get out of bed. Your body feels like it weighs a million tons and the last place you want to be is in the workplace. You start to experience constant exhaustion in all aspects of life and you have trouble mustering the energy for anything. You may not be able to sleep at night because your mind is still back at work. Additionally, your immune system may take a turn for the worst causing you to develop consistent headaches or get sick more often than usual.

Mental Health. This is also another massive sign that you are taking on too much. You may notice that when at work you have a hard time focusing on any tasks, no matter how small. Everything starts to pile up and you notice that at the end of the day not much has gotten done or its not done properly. You might find yourself going through symptoms of being angry, depressed, and anxious both in the workplace and at home. An example would be feeling upset or frustrated by something that a coworker has done that might be as simple as socializing in the office, being happy in the morning, or finishing a project on time. Their causes for celebration make you feel worse and you feel like your feelings in general are magnified by ten.

Accomplishment. Another sign that you may be experiencing burnout includes feeling a lack of accomplishment. You feel as though nothing you get done is worthy of praise. You feel that your work isn’t good enough no matter how hard you try or how well you have done. While you are doing more and more or are taking on challenging tasks you feel as though you are still not doing enough to be noticed.

Social Health. Work has become everything. You have trouble thinking about anything else and you’re starting to miss birthdays, weddings, and holiday events. You don’t go out with your friends anymore and you don’t know what’s going on in anyone’s life. You’re taking on more and more work, but you aren’t taking out any time for yourself. You find that you don’t understand some conversations that revolve around things that might have happened outside of work. The physical and mental health effects are flowing over into your personal life. You’re angry with people that you shouldn’t be or your mood is affecting how you act at home.

Career Ledging. Now this is a topic that is up and coming. It pertains the moment when you have “peaked” in your career and you don’t know how to move forward. Some say it may even be more important than burnout. It’s important to mention this sign because it may lead you to understand whether you are truly burned out or are just stuck and don’t know how to move forward in your career.

What can you do?

Know your limits. It is so important to understand how much you can do and how much you need to do. While you want to work hard and show that you have the potential to be a wonderful employee, you also want to be able to stay consistent and not burn out in the process. If you come in to work early don’t also leave late or take on too many projects. Understand when you need to say no. Note that you may have been able to work seven days a week as a new graduate, but this can become harder when you start a family. A great tip is to take on one project at a time and do your best on that project before moving on to the next. In this way you effectively focus your time and energy without overworking yourself. You show that you can work hard, have impeccable time management and balance because you can stay consistent rather than burning out in the long run.

Set attainable short-term goals. You always hear about looking at the big picture, and that is an important aspect of business. However, you can have a big picture and still set smaller goals for yourself. Whether it be to get to work at a certain time, accomplish a certain step to beginning a project, or any other aspect of a big project or work task. Setting smaller goals and reaching them can give you a great sense of accomplishment until you reach your long-term goals.

Balance your life. It’s great to have big goals within the workplace, but try to set apart your work time and your personal life. When you get home disconnect from the worries of work and focus on your personal passions and social life. Don’t constantly check your work emails or text messages when you are at home. Set work contacts to “Hide Alerts” when you get home if that helps you. Set time aside to spend with your family and friends. Choose work hours that will help you to do so. If working in the mornings and being available in the afternoon or at night is the best fit for you then don’t be afraid to request that change.

Change your routines. A great way to relieve symptoms of burnout is to switch things up with your routine. If you always do things the same way, it may become monotonous. Do you normally pack a lunch? This time take some cash with you and go out for lunch somewhere new and close to the office. Do you usually work out after you get home? Try waking up earlier and going for a short run or even meditating before taking your cup of coffee. Are you able to take your laptop outside or work in a different part of the office? Go out to work events, talks or panels and network with the other professionals in your area. Not only do you get a change from the usual work scenery, but you get your name out into your industry. Anything you can do to make a fun and different spin in your daily work life can help in a big way.

Stay active with patients. Be present with your patients and what they have to say. Talk to them about their personal lives or their concerns and activities. Sometimes it can be very uplifting to hear their inputs or recent events. It can help move your mind away from your own stressors for the moment or help you understand where you should truly be putting your focus. At times patients can be extremely perceptive and they will tell you when they see that you are acting differently at work. Use this as an indicator that it is time to make a change.
In the end burnout is something that can affect anyone, but it is up to you to take that negative situation and turn it into a positive for yourself. You don’t want to get stuck or keep feeling the way you feel and perhaps these tips can help you to make the change you need.

5 Traits of a Great Regional Manager in Corporate Optometry

5 Traits of a Great Regional Manager in Corporate Optometry.